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People wait in line at Food Bank Community Kitchen on Nov. 25 in New York City. Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York City

America's food banks are sounding the alarm during this unprecedented holiday season.

The big picture: Soup kitchens and charities, usually brimming with holiday volunteers, are getting far less help.

  • Older volunteers, at high risk from the virus, are staying home. A food bank in Idaho Falls fed up to 200 hungry people a day pre-pandemic, but closed completely this month because of lack of volunteers, Reuters reports.
  • 60% of food banks with Feeding America — the largest such network in the country — reported they could use more volunteers.
  • Over 50 million people in the U.S., including 17 million children, could become food insecure this year due to the pandemic, per a Feeding America analysis.

What they're saying: “We are in desperate need of volunteers ... in the soup kitchen especially,” Salvation Army volunteer Erin Rischawy told the Pennsylvania Capital-Star.

  • “With shelters being on the high-risk list to contract and spread COVID, we had to make the difficult decision to still celebrate but not do it as we normally do,” Tara Davis, executive director of Friendship Mission, told the Montgomery Advertiser.

The other side: Some charities are purposefully going without their usual number of volunteers, or asking people to stay home due to COVID-19 safety concerns.

  • Miriam's Kitchen, a D.C. nonprofit, is working with only eight volunteers per shift in outdoor tents to deliver meals to the city's homeless population.

Go deeper: In photos: Americans wait at food banks before Thanksgiving

Go deeper

Jan 23, 2021 - World

Brazil begins distributing AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine

Containers carrying doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine arrive in Brazil. Photo: Maurio Pimentel/AFP via Getty Images

Brazil on Saturday began distributing the 2 million doses of the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine that arrived from India Friday, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: Brazil has the third highest COVID-19 case-count in the world, according to Johns Hopkins University data. The 2 million doses "only scratch the surface of the shortfall," Brazilian public health experts told the AP.

Latest James Bond movie release delayed for third time

An advertisement poster featuring Daniel Craig in the new James Bond movie "No Time to Die" in Bangkok, Thailand. Photo: Mladen Antonov/AFP via Getty Images

The release of the latest James Bond film, "No Time to Die," has been postponed for the third time as the coronavirus pandemic continues to devastate Hollywood.

The state of play: The film's release, initially scheduled for April 2020, was first postponed to November 2020, and then to April 2021. MGM said this week that movie's global debut will now be delayed until Oct. 8.

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