Data: Johns Hopkins University; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

More than 100,000 Americans have died of the coronavirus, according to data from Johns Hopkins — a terrible milestone that puts the death toll far beyond some of the most tragic events in U.S. history.

By the numbers: The death toll from COVID-19 now stands at more than 34 times the number of people who died on 9/11.

  • About 25,000 African Americans have died. That's more than three times the number of African American soldiers who were killed in Vietnam.
  • A majority of the deaths — about 56% — has been Americans over the age of 65. Still, more than 500 Americans under the age of 35 have died. That's 10 times the number of people who died at the Pulse nightclub shooting in Florida.

New York has suffered the worst of the crisis, with nearly 30,000 deaths. It's followed by New Jersey, with just over 11,000. Washington state, which saw the first major outbreak in the U.S., has had just 1,100 deaths.

The bottom line: These are just the deaths we know of. Public health experts believe the actual toll could be higher — because there have likely been deaths that were never officially linked to the virus.

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Updated Oct 7, 2020 - Health

World coronavirus updates

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Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

New Zealand now has active no coronavirus cases in the community after the final six people linked to the Auckland cluster recovered, the country's Health Ministry confirmed in an email Wednesday.

The big picture: The country's second outbreak won't officially be declared closed until there have been "no new cases for two incubation periods," the ministry said. Auckland will join the rest of NZ in enjoying no domestic restrictions from late Wednesday, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said, declaring that NZ had "beat the virus again."

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: The swing states where the pandemic is raging — Pence no longer expected to attend Barrett confirmation vote after COVID exposure.
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day case records last week
  3. Business: Where stimulus is needed most.
  4. Education: The dangerous instability of school re-openings.
  5. World: Restrictions grow across Europe.
  6. Media: Fox News president and several hosts advised to quarantine.

Pew: Record 52% of young adults in U.S. are living with their parents

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

A higher percentage of young adults in the U.S. are living with their parents now than they were at the end of the Great Depression, according to Pew Research data released Friday.

Why it matters: The data suggest that the economic uncertainty and continuing unemployment brought on by the coronavirus pandemic are pushing more young adults to move in with their parents.