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Reproduced from Pew Research Center; Chart: Axios Visuals

Most people across 14 wealthy countries surveyed by Pew tend to think their country has handled the pandemic well — and in Denmark and Australia that view is near-universal.

The flipside: There are two exceptions to the generally positive outlook: the U.S. and U.K. Americans were also by far the most likely to say the pandemic has divided their country (77%), rather than uniting it (18%).

Even in hard-hit countries like Italy and Belgium, which has the world's highest population-adjusted death rate, views are generally positive.

  • Despite their controversial no-lockdown approach, Swedes also tend to think their country has performed well. They're also among the most likely to believe it has united their country (58%).
  • Responses are overwhelmingly positive in South Korea and Germany, which have been widely praised for their strong responses to the virus.
  • Danes (72%) and Canadians (66%) are most likely to say the pandemic has been unifying.

Between the lines: The polling was conducted throughout the summer, when most of these countries — but not the U.S. — had either bounced back from large initial outbreaks, or managed to avoid them.

What to watch: Several European countries have seen sharp spikes in cases in recent weeks.

  • Spain now has the highest infection rate in Europe. France isn't far behind, while Italy recorded its highest single-day case total since May on Thursday.
  • Death rates across Europe remain far lower than those seen in recent weeks in the U.S. and Latin America.
  • While cases in the U.S. are ticking downward, America still accounted for 18% of all new cases recorded worldwide over the last week, as well as 18% of deaths.

Go deeper: U.S. far behind other rich countries in coronavirus response

Go deeper

Oct 29, 2020 - World

Taiwan reaches a record 200 days with no local coronavirus cases

Catholics go through containment protocols including body-temperature measurement and hands-sanitisation before entering the Saint Christopher Parish Church, Taipei City, Taiwan, in July. Photo: Ceng Shou Yi/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Taiwan on Thursday marked no locally transmitted coronavirus cases for 200 days, as the island of 23 million people's total number of infections reported stands at 550 and the COVID-19 death toll at seven.

Why it matters: Nowhere else has reached such a milestone. While COVID-19 cases surge across the U.S. and Europe, Taiwan's last locally transmitted case was on April 12. Experts credit tightly regulated travel, early border closure, "rigorous contact tracing, technology-enforced quarantine and universal mask wearing" and the island state's previous experience with the SARS virus for the achievement, per Bloomberg.

Go deeper: As Taiwan's profile rises, so does risk of conflict with China

10 hours ago - Health

Coronavirus surge threatens to shut classrooms down again

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The nationwide surge in coronavirus cases is forcing many school districts to pull back from in-person instruction.

Why it matters: Remote learning is a burden on parents, teachers and students. But the wave of new infections, and its strain on some hospitals' capacity, makes all forms of reopening harder to justify.