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Rep. Grace Meng. Photo: Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

A new Facebook campaign by a political arm of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus identifies the Republican lawmakers who voted against a resolution in September denouncing anti-Asian racism, NBC News reports.

Why it matters: A number of Republicans, including President Trump, have repeatedly used racist rhetoric like “China plague” and “kung flu” to refer to the coronavirus. Research shows that anti-Asian bias rose 800% after terms like "Chinese virus" rose to prominence in conservative media in March.

The state of play: The ads launched on Facebook target the districts of GOP lawmakers who voted against the resolution, which passed last month 243-164. Only 14 Republicans crossed party lines to support the measure.

  • The campaign has already run in Texas and California.

Details: The resolution, sponsored by Rep. Grace Meng (D-N.Y.), “condemns all manifestations of expressions of racism, xenophobia, discrimination, anti-Asian sentiment, scapegoating, and ethnic or religious intolerance.”

  • The resolution calls on public officials to denounce anti-Asian racism of any form and urges federal law enforcement to investigate reports of hate incidents. It also commits U.S. leadership to combat misinformation and disinformation that threaten Asian Americans.
  • Meng received racist voicemails after the resolution passed.

The other side: "I will promise you this. There is no kitchen in America that thinks this is the priority," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), who has used the term “Chinese coronavirus,” said on the floor during the resolution debate, according to NBC News.

  • "At the heart of this resolution is a served notion that referring to the virus as a ‘Wuhan virus’ or the ‘China virus’ is the same as contributing to violence against Asian Americans. Which I will tell you nobody on this side of the aisle supports.”

What they’re saying: UN experts criticized the U.S. in a mandate last week, writing that anti-Asian hate has reached an “alarming level” and that “authorities have utterly failed to take the steps required to detect, monitor, and prevent racist and xenophobic incidents."

By the numbers: 2,583 incidents of anti-Asian bias were reported to Stop AAPI Hate from March 19 to Aug. 5. In many cases, perpetrators used language akin to “China virus.”

Flashback: Asian Americans have been linked to disease and foreignness throughout their history in the United States.

What to watch: Asian American voters could prove to be the margin of victory in a number of swing states, experts say.

Go deeper

Nov 17, 2020 - World

Biden's Day 1 challenges: China damage control

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The day he enters the White House, President-elect Joe Biden will inherit a host of China-related challenges that require immediate action, from restoring diplomatic backchannels with China to figuring out what to do about lingering tariffs.

The big picture: Biden must find a way to put the U.S.-China relationship on a more sustainable path while preserving U.S. national security interests and blocking China's efforts to weaken international norms.

Updated 2 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Vaccines: Here's key information about the effective COVID-19 vaccines — Oxford University's 90%-effective vaccine — New deals in the COVID economy.
  2. Health: U.S. coronavirus hospitalizations keep breaking recordsWhy we're numb to 250,000 coronavirus deaths — Americans line up for testing ahead of Thanksgiving.
  3. Travel: Air travel's COVID-created future — Over 1 million U.S. travelers flew on Friday, despite calls to avoid holiday travel.
  4. Politics: California governor and family in quarantine — Sen. Kelly Loeffler to continue quarantine — Operation Warp Speed leader: COVID vaccine push is "isolated from a political environment."
  5. World: England to impose stricter regional systemU.S. coronavirus hotspots far outpacing Europe's — Portugal to ban domestic travel for national holidays.
  6. Economy: The biggest pandemic labor market drags.
  7. Sports: Coronavirus precautions leave college basketball schedule in flux.

Biden transition names first Cabinet nominees

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden on Monday unveiled his nominations for top national security positions in his administration, tapping former secretary of state John Kerry as his climate czar and former deputy national security adviser Avril Haines as director of national intelligence.

Why it matters: Haines, if confirmed, would make history as the first woman to oversee the U.S. intelligence community. Biden also plans to nominate Alejandro Mayorkas to become the first Latino secretary of the Department of Homeland Security.