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Jim Vandehai and Rep. Jahana Hayes. Photo: Axios

Rep. Jahana Hayes (D-Conn.), during an Axios event Thursday, called the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's guidance for reopening schools "so completely unrealistic".

The big picture: The CDC released guidance this week on reopening nonessential businesses, including schools, and advises administrators to consult with local health departments to gradually scale-up operations for schools safely.

The guidance suggests staff and students receive temperature checks daily and to disinfect classrooms and buses daily when in-person learning returns.

  • Staff should also wear face coverings.

What she's saying: "Anyone who’s ever been in a classroom knows this list will not work. Education and teaching is about relationships. It is about making kids feel confident and helping them to take a step out of when they’re really not sure what they’re doing."

Why it matters: The guidance from CDC comes as many schools begin to plan how to tackle the next school year in the fall.

  • However, most states and cities have already reopened most of their non-essential businesses in some capacity without adopting the Centers' roadmap.

Go deeper

Updated Aug 29, 2020 - Health

University of Alabama reports 1,052 COVID-19 cases since in-person classes began

Photo: Wesley Hitt/Getty Images

The University of Alabama on Friday reported an additional 485 confirmed cases of COVID-19 among students, faculty and staff since in-person classes resumed on Aug. 19, bringing the total number cases up to 1,052, according to the university's coronavirus dashboard.

Why it matters: The outbreak underscores concerns from public health experts that in-person classes could cause community spread within school populations. The total reported on Friday does not include the 381 positive tests caught when students, faculty and staff first re-entered campus.

Updated 11 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Health: Nursing homes are still getting pummeledU.S. could hit herd immunity by end of summer 2021 if Americans embrace virus vaccines, Fauci says.
  2. Politics: Pelosi, Schumer call on McConnell to adopt bipartisan $900B stimulus framework.
  3. World: U.K. clears Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for mass rollout — Putin says Russia will begin large-scale vaccination next week.
  4. Business: Investors are finally starting to take their money out of safe-haven Treasuries.
  5. Sports: The end of COVID’s grip on sports may be in sight.

2 TikTok stars charged for L.A. "mega-parties"

Bryce Hall and Blake Gray in Los Angeles, California. Photo: fupp/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images

TikTok influencers Blake Gray and Bryce Hall face criminal charges for hosting "mega-parties" in the Hollywood Hills despite a city ban on large gatherings due to the coronavirus pandemic, authorities announced on Friday.

Why it matters: Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer described the charges as a part of a "crackdown" on house parties that pose a risk to public health.