Dec 12, 2019

Congress reaches tentative spending deal to stave off government shutdown

Nita Lowey. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Democratic and Republican negotiators in the House and Senate reached a deal "in principle" to fund the federal government through the rest of the 2020 fiscal year, House Appropriations Chair Nita Lowey (D-N.Y.) confirmed Thursday.

Why it matters: A looming Dec. 20 funding deadline had lawmakers fearing another government shutdown, which would come into effect days after the House is set to vote on articles of impeachment. Details of the $1.3 trillion spending deal are still being hammered out, but a vote in the House is expected to be scheduled for Tuesday.

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House Judiciary Committee approves articles of impeachment against Trump

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee approved two articles of impeachment against President Trump — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — on Friday.

Why it matters: The party-line 23-17 votes, which were delayed after a marathon markup hearing on Thursday lasted until almost midnight, completes the House committees' impeachment work and advances the articles to the House chamber for a full floor vote next week.

Go deeperArrowDec 13, 2019

Senate passes $1.37 trillion spending deal

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP/ Getty Images

The Senate on Thursday voted 81-11 to approve a $1.37 trillion spending measure to avoid a government shutdown when federal funding runs out at midnight on Friday, NPR reports.

What they're saying: Kellyanne Conway told reporters President Trump is “very happy” about the legislation and signaled that he plans to sign the two bills to avoid a shutdown, according to CNBC.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Dec 19, 2019

Trump signs $1.37 trillion spending deal, averting federal shutdown

President Trump on Dec. 19. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump on Friday evening signed a $1.37 trillion spending measure to avoid a government shutdown, according to CNBC.

Why it matters: Unlike last year, when the U.S. government shut down for 35 days from December through January, Trump was willing to accept less funding than he originally requested for the U.S.-Mexico border. He wanted $8 billion for the wall, but Congress only fulfilled $1.375 billion for fence construction, according to NPR.

Go deeperArrowDec 21, 2019