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Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced Tuesday that the Senate is not expected to travel back to Washington D.C. any sooner than May 4, as most of the country remains under stay-at-home orders.

Why it matters: The decision to postpone returning to the Senate comes amid a stalemate between Democrats and Republicans over increasing funds to the Paycheck Protection Program, a small business relief program mean to alleviate economic stress caused by the pandemic.

  • House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer also announced Monday that the lower chamber won't return to Congress before May 4.
  • Both the Senate and the House can still pass bills via unanimous consent, though it would mean just one lawmaker could block legislation by showing up to Congress to object. Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Ky.) has threatened to do so.

What they're saying:

"As the country continues working together to flatten the curve, following the advice of health experts, the full Senate is not expected to travel back to Washington D.C. sooner than Monday, May 4th. All members will receive at least 24 hours’ notice if this changes. This bipartisan decision reflects consultation with Leader Schumer and my colleagues in Senate leadership."
— Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell

Go deeper: A high-stakes clash over coronavirus funding looms over Congress

Go deeper

Texas AG sues Biden administration over deportation freeze

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks to members of the media in 2016. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing the Biden administration in federal district court over its 100-day freeze on deporting unauthorized immigrants, and he's asking for a temporary restraining order.

Between the lines: The freeze went into effect Friday, temporarily halting most immigration enforcement in the U.S. In the lawsuit, Paxton claims the move "violates the U.S. Constitution, federal immigration and administrative law, and a contractual agreement between Texas" and the Department of Homeland Security.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
3 hours ago - Podcasts

Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck

President Biden has said that getting Americans vaccinated for COVID-19 is his administration’s top priority given an initial rollout plagued by organizational, logistical and technical glitches.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the bottlenecks and how to unclog them with Carbon Health chief executive Eren Bali, whose company recently began helping to manage vaccinations in Los Angeles.