Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

While Europe has taken the lead on imposing strict privacy rules, online platforms enjoy lighter oversight in the U.S.

What's happening: States are stepping up to fill the void. Silicon Valley is most panicked about California's privacy law that takes effect next year. Washington state, New York and others are drafting their own rules.

Tech giants have made it clear that their top priority is persuading Congress to pass legislation that overrules, or "pre-empts," state laws.

  • Democrats on Capitol Hill see an opening to impose some tough requirements — like giving the Federal Trade Commission more authority or making web platforms more liable for data leaks — as part of that bargain.
  • At least three privacy bills have been introduced so far in Congress the year and more will probably be re-introduced from the last session. There will also be new proposals, including one on kids privacy from Sens. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) and Ed Markey (D-Mass.).

The clock is ticking: This year is the most likely window for bipartisan legislation, as passing laws during the 2020 election year will be tough.

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Justice Department sues Google over alleged search monopoly

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

The Justice Department and 11 states Tuesday filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, accusing the company of using anticompetitive tactics to illegally monopolize the online search and search advertising markets.

Why it matters: The long-awaited suit is Washington's first major blow against the tech giants that many on both the right and left argue have grown too large and powerful. Still, this is just step one in what could be a lengthy and messy court battle.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Americans feel Trump's sickness makes him harder to trustFlorida breaks record for in-person early voting.
  2. Health: The next wave is gaining steam.
  3. Education: Schools haven't become hotspots.
  4. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 5 million infections.

In photos: Florida breaks record for in-person early voting

Voters wait in line at John F. Kennedy Public Library in Hialeah, Florida on Oct. 19. Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

More Floridians cast early ballots for the 2020 election on Monday than in the first day of in-person early voting in 2016, shattering the previous record by over 50,000 votes, Politico reports.

The big picture: Voters have already cast over 31 million ballots in early voting states as of Tuesday, per the U.S. Elections Project database by Michael McDonald, an elections expert at the University of Florida.