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Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Congressional Republicans have come around to supporting paid family leave policies, but their ideas differ greatly from Democratic proposals, a New York Times analysis shows.

The big picture: Democrats back creating a federal fund for new parents that would be financed with a payroll tax increase, while Republicans have proposed plans that would allow new parents to dip into their future federal benefits.

The big picture: Democrats introduced the Family Act in 2013, which would cover 12 weeks of partly paid leave for new parents (or workers who are seriously ill or injured) and would be financed by a 0.2% increase in payroll taxes on employers and employees.

  • Since its introduction, the bill has stalled in Congress because most Republicans refuse to back a tax increase.
  • Republicans have pitched multiple proposals. One would allow new parents to collect Social Security benefits early in exchange for receiving less money when they retire. Another lets people use pretax savings accounts to save for leave, and a third creates a tax credit for companies that voluntarily provide family leave.
  • Like their representatives, voters largely agree on paid leave but disagree on who should pay for it.

There is a bipartisan bill in both the House and Senate that is expected to be introduced in the next month. Under this plan, parents could withdraw $5,000 of their child tax credits after birth for paid leave or other infant care expenses, but they would collect a smaller credit in the future.

  • However, it's still unclear if this bill would see wide buy-in from Democrats.

Of note: President Trump was among the first Republican presidential candidates to call for paid leave in 2016. The White House's budget proposal would require states to provide at least six weeks of paid family leave to new parents, including adoptive parents.

  • The proposal gives states broad flexibility to determine how they finance the benefit.

Go deeper:

Editor's note: This story has been updated with more details from the White House's budget proposal.

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Sports

Olympics dashboard

🚨: Japan's Naomi Osaka lights Olympic cauldron; Photos

👻: How the no-spectator Olympics could affect the athletes

🇺🇸: "What an honor it is to watch you soar," first lady tells U.S. Olympians

🌏: Meet the underdogs from Latin America

🥇: The six new sports at Tokyo 2020

💉 About 100 U.S. Olympic athletes are unvaccinated

✍️ Axios at the Olympics: What it's like inside the opening ceremony

Go deeper: Full Axios coverage

Senate Democrats demand answers on FBI's Kavanaugh probe

Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Senate Democrats are demanding that the FBI hand over "all records and communications" related to the FBI tip line set up to investigate Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh when he was a nominee in 2018.

Why it matters: The ask comes after the FBI revealed it received more than 4,500 tips about Kavanaugh when he was awaiting Senate confirmation amid sexual assault allegations. Only the most "relevant" of these tips were forwarded to the Trump White House.

Chip relief on the horizon

Illustration: Sarah Grillo

Good news: The worst of the chip supply crunch might be near.

The other side: Here's the bad news... CEOs say chips totally flowing like normal is still a ways out.

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