Even as experts worry over the havoc AI could bring to financial markets, quantitative hedge fund strategies actually aren't outsmarting more human-reliant competitors in recent quarters, according to Bloomberg.

Quant fund managers — who feed huge caches of data to sophisticated, proprietary algorithms to find inefficiencies in the market they can exploit for profit — are struggling to keep pace with the broader market, and some funds, like the once-promising R&F Capital, are shuttering their doors altogether.

Why quants are struggling: Noted quant fund investor Neal Berger wrote in a letter to clients this summer that it comes down to two factors:

  • Increased competition: more investors are using algorithms to fight over the same inefficiencies in the market.
  • Low volatility: quantitative funds are most successful in an environment where there is large disagreements in the market over the prices of assets. Today there is little disagreement, and the best way to earn outsized returns is placed highly leveraged bets that the market will remain calm. That's working for some investors, but is far too risky for others.

So what explains low volatility? Market watchers have been scratching their heads for an explanation for low volatility even as traders have processed important unexpected events like Brexit and the election of Donald Trump. But one answer is the increasing popularity of index funds that allow individual investors to buy into a broad diversified set of stocks or other assets that reallocate automatically. Instead of individual investors duking it out with competing stock picks, many are choosing just to buy a small but broad slice of the market, and letting it ride.

What's next: Quants won't take their disappointing returns lying down. Major investors like Paul Tudor Jones are putting money behind investment strategies powered by artificial intelligence that aim to use ever larger data sets and more sophisticated algorithms to weed out profitable inefficiencies in the market.

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Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.

Facebook goes after Apple

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Facebook is seeking to force a face-off with Apple over its 30% in-app purchase commission fee, which Facebook suggests hurts small businesses struggling to get by during the pandemic.

The big picture: Facebook has never publicly gone after Apple, a key strategic partner, this aggressively. Both companies face antitrust scrutiny, which in Apple's case has centered on the very fee structure Facebook is now attacking.

41 mins ago - World

Exclusive: UAE wants Israel normalization finalized "as soon as possible," minister says

Anwar Gargash. Photo: Shraf Shazly/AFP via Getty Images

The UAE's Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Anwar Gargash, told me in an exclusive interview that his country wants to implement its normalization deal with Israel “as soon as possible."

What he's saying: Gargash said he was confident that the U.S.-brokered deal moved Israeli annexation of the West Bank off the table for a “long time.” He also said Israeli tourists would soon be able to travel to the UAE.