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Adapted from PwC; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

The stock market has shown limited reaction to changes in polling on the presidential election and PwC's latest survey of top executives show most have largely similar plans for the future regardless of who wins in November.

Watch this space: The PwC survey also showed that execs are almost uniformly in support of additional stimulus measures, with 95% saying some type of fiscal policy is needed and 78% saying their own business needs further fiscal policy support.

Go deeper

Updated 17 mins ago - World

Mexican President López Obrador tests positive for coronavirus

Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador during a press conference at National Palace in Mexico City, Mexico, on Wednesday. Photo: Ismael Rosas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador announced Sunday evening that he's tested positive for COVID-19.

Driving the news: López Obrador tweeted that he has mild symptoms and is receiving medical treatment. "As always, I am optimistic," he added. "We will all move forward."

Coronavirus has inflamed global inequality

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

History will likely remember the pandemic as the "first time since records began that inequality rose in virtually every country on earth at the same time." That's the verdict from Oxfam's inequality report covering the year 2020 — a terrible year that hit the poorest, hardest across the planet.

Why it matters: The world's poorest were already in a race against time, facing down an existential risk in the form of global climate change. The coronavirus pandemic could set global poverty reduction back as much as a full decade, according to the World Bank.