Updated Apr 21, 2019

In photos: Colorado marks Columbine High School massacre, 20 years on

Columbine High School Shooting survivors Sean Graves and Patrick Ireland. Photo: Hyoung Chang/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Community members, survivors and victims' families came together at Clement Park in Littleton, Colorado, to mark 20 years since the Columbine High School shooting massacre.

Details: A series of events honored those affected by the shooting, which killed 12 students and 1 teacher on April 20, 1999, including a remembrance ceremony. At the event, audience members cried and cheered survivor Sean Graves' onto the stage, the Denver Post reports. Here are some of the most powerful moments from the events.

Michael Scott (R) and Marie Sophie (L) visit the grave of his sister, Rachel Scott, at the Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens in Littleton, Colorado. Photo: Jason Connolly/AFP/Getty Images
The Queen City Pipe Band marches past the crowd at the end of the Columbine Remembrance Ceremony. Photo: Jason Connolly/AFP/Getty Images
Michelle Aguayo and her daughter, Ciara Shannon, view crosses with the names of students killed in the 1999 attack. Photo: Joe Mahoney/Getty Images
Michael Scott (R) and Marie Sophie (L) visit the grave of his sister, Rachel Scott, at the Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens in Littleton, Colorado. Photo: Jason Connolly/AFP/Getty Images
Columbine High School teacher Ivory Moore (C) rallies up community members during the remembrance ceremony. Photo: Jason Connolly/AFP/Getty Images
A video message from President Bill Clinton is played on a screen during the remembrance ceremony. Photo: Jason Connolly/AFP/Getty Images
Columbine High School students gather with community members at the remembrance service. Photo: Jason Connolly/AFP/Getty Images
Flowers are placed at the "Columbine: 20 years" event in honor of those impacted by the massacre. Photo by Hyoung Chang/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images
The Columbine Memorial in Clement Park. Photo: Hyoung Chang/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images
A community vigil for the Columbine High School shooting victims. Photo: Jason Connolly/AFP/Getty Images

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