Evan Vucci / AP

CNN has a lengthy new report by a group of reporters — including Jake Tapper, Evan Perez, Carl Bernstein and Jim Sciutto — claiming that U.S. intelligence officials have warned Trump that Russia is trying to compromise him.

What's new:

  1. Trump and Obama were briefed last week on a two-page synopsis of a report compiled by a former British spy at the behest of opposition researchers.
  2. The briefers were the heads of the four main intelligence agencies: The FBI, CIA, NSA and Director of National Intelligence.
  3. The briefing was on "allegations that Russian operatives claim to have compromising personal and financial information about Mr. Trump..."

What we already knew: A former European intel operative had compiled a report claiming ties between Trump and Russia. A story on this ran in Mother Jones the week before the election.

What we still don't know: CNN claims to have seen the memos that sourced the report, but they aren't reporting on details because they can't independently verify them. The FBI is looking into the details and also hasn't verified them. We also don't know the identities of the figures in Trumpworld supposedly tied to Russia.

The original Mother Jones story cites Paul Manafort. CNN doesn't, but gives credit to Mother Jones for the original story.

What's next: Sen. Ron Wyden called out FBI Director Comey today, asking whether the FBI report on this will go public before the inauguration. Comey said no.

Go deeper

BodyArmor takes aim at Gatorade's sports drink dominance

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

BodyArmor is making noise in the sports drink market, announcing seven new athlete partnerships last week, including Christian McCaffrey, Sabrina Ionescu and Ronald Acuña Jr.

Why it matters: It wants to market itself as a worthy challenger to the throne that Gatorade has occupied for nearly six decades.

S&P 500's historic rebound leaves investors divided on future

Data: Money.net; Chart: Axios Visuals

The S&P 500 nearly closed at an all-time high on Wednesday and remains poised to go from peak to trough to peak in less than half a year.

By the numbers: Since hitting its low on March 23, the S&P has risen about 50%, with more than 40 of its members doubling, according to Bloomberg. The $12 trillion dollars of share value that vanished in late March has almost completely returned.

Newsrooms abandoned as pandemic drags on

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Facing enormous financial pressure and uncertainty around reopenings, media companies are giving up on their years-long building leases for more permanent work-from-home structures. Others are letting employees work remotely for the foreseeable future.

Why it matters: Real estate is often the most expensive asset that media companies own. And for companies that don't own their space, it's often the biggest expense.