Nov 19, 2019

How climate change threatens Superfund sites

Reproduced from a U.S. Government Accountability Office map; Map: Axios Visuals

A newly public federal report finds that 945 Superfund sites — around 60% of the nation's total — could be affected by sea-level rise, wildfires and other climate change-related harms.

Why it matters: The Government Accountability Office report warns of more frequent or intense events that damage the waste sites and "lead to releases of contaminants that could pose risks to human health and the environment."

What's next: The study by the congressional watchdog recommends, among other things, that EPA take steps to integrate climate into the Superfund program's risk and response planning.

But, but, but: EPA, in a response included with the report, pushed back against some of the suggestions.

A senior official writes that the program, under existing practices, "adequately ensure that risks and any effects of severe weather events, that may increase in intensity, duration, or frequency, are woven into risk response decisions" for the sites.

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Wireless' next challenge is climate change

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Wireless companies whose networks are threatened by hurricanes, floods, fires and other extreme weather are rebuilding to withstand repeat disasters and factoring climate change into their long-term planning.

The big picture: While partisan disputes deadlock federal action on climate change, companies are preparing for it as a reality that is affecting their future services as well as their bottom lines.

Go deeperArrowNov 25, 2019

Why climate change is a defining issue for 2020

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo by J. Countess/Getty Images

Climate change is playing a larger — and more polarizing — role than ever before in a presidential election.

Why it matters: In the past, the topic barely registered with voters and candidates were less polarized. Today, all Democratic candidates are treating it as a crisis, with detailed plans and funding sources to address it, while President Trump ignores the problem and bashes those plans.

Go deeperArrowNov 25, 2019

What makes the 2020 election historic for climate change

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: J. Countess/Getty Images

Climate change is playing a larger — and more polarizing — role than ever before in a presidential election.

Why it matters: In the past, the topic barely registered with voters and candidates were less polarized. Today, all Democratic candidates are treating it as a crisis, with detailed plans and funding sources to address it, while President Trump ignores the problem and bashes those plans.