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September 2018 ranked as the fifth-warmest September on record dating back to 1895, with monthly temperature anomalies shown on this map. Image: NASA

September 2018 was the planet's fifth-warmest September on record, and the world is poised to record its fourth-warmest year, according to new data NASA released Monday.

Why this matters: According to Gavin Schmidt, the director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, 2018 is also likely to be the fourth year in a row with an average temperature of 1ºC, or 1.8ºF, above the 19th century average. A recent climate report from the UN warned of severe consequences if global warming is not limited to 1.5ºC, or 2.7ºF, above average, compared to preindustrial levels.

The details: During September, the eastern U.S. was much warmer than average, as was Europe, the Russian Arctic and Alaska. South America, Africa and Australia were also warmer than average. In fact, Earth's only cool spots during September could be found in northwest Canada, parts of the North Atlantic near Greenland and northeastern Antarctica.

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

Based on data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which also keeps tabs on global temperatures:

  • The five warmest years in the global record have all come in the 2010s.
  • The 10 warmest years on record have come since 1998.

The big picture: With an El Niño event developing in the tropical Pacific Ocean, it's likely that 2019 will be warmer than 2018, since such events tend to transfer more heat from the oceans to the atmosphere.

  • The scientific community has concluded that human-caused emissions of greenhouse gases are behind the sharp warming trend seen in recent decades and that only sharp cuts in such emissions can reverse such a trend.

Between the lines: President Donald Trump, however, may disagree with this conclusion, saying in an interview with "60 Minutes" that aired Sunday that he's not sure if climate change is "man-made."

"I think something’s happening. Something’s changing and it’ll change back again. I don't think it's a hoax, I think there's probably a difference. But I don't know that it's man-made."

Go deeper: Key global warming target slipping out of reach, UN scientists warn

Go deeper

Exclusive: Houston mayor to lead Black mayors group

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner speaks during a private funeral for George Floyd. Photo: Godofredo A. Vásquez/Pool/Getty Images

The mayor of the city where George Floyd was raised is taking over a group that represents 500 Black mayors in the U.S. amid national pressure to revamp police departments.

Why it matters: Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner will become the new president of the African American Mayors Association as municipalities across the country examine police reforms and deal with the economic fallout from the pandemic.

Delivery industry sees biggest monthly job losses in more than 20 years

Data: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; Chart: Axios Visuals

The pandemic's biggest job winner is losing steam.

Driving the news: People who deliver packages to businesses and homes — classified as "couriers and messengers" by the Labor Department — saw the industry's biggest monthly job losses in more than 20 years in April.

FDA authorizes Pfizer COVID vaccine for 12- to 15-year-olds

Photo: Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration authorized the emergency use of the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine for 12- to 15-year-old adolescents, the agency announced on Monday.

Why it matters: The emergency authorization marks a critical milestone in the push to get more Americans vaccinated and fully reopen schools for in-person learning this fall.