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President Trump signed the act that established the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency in 2018. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty

A top committee made up of officials from the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and its election partners refuted President Trump’s claims of widespread voter fraud and irregularities in a statement Thursday, calling the election "the most secure in American history."

The big picture: Trump has refused to concede to President-elect Joe Biden and is pursuing lawsuits in a number of states with baseless claims of voter fraud. The public statement from the president's own Department of Homeland Security undermines his narrative and is sure to infuriate him.

What they’re saying: “There is no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes or was in any way compromised," members of the Election Infrastructure Government Coordinating Council (GCC) Executive Committee said in a statement.

  • Voting systems were made secure through pre-election testing, state certification of voting equipment and the U.S. Election Assistance Commission’s certification of equipment.
  • The joint statement acknowledged “opportunities for misinformation” and urged voters to seek out election officials as “trusted voices.”

Between the lines: This government statement about the election being secure should be unremarkable, Axios' Jonathan Swan notes.

  • But the sad reality is it’s a dangerous document for the officials who wrote it.
  • Every person who had a hand in writing it will almost certainly face the wrath of Trump and his inner circle in the White House.

Driving the news: CISA director Christopher Krebs has told associates he expects to be fired after he angered the White House by debunking election misinformation promoted by Trump online, Reuters first reported Thursday.

  • The White House also asked Bryan Ware, assistant director for cybersecurity at CISA, to hand in his resignation, which he did on Thursday, according to Reuters.

Go deeper

Jan 26, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Scoop: Hundreds of Biden staffers receive COVID vaccine

Screenshots of an email inviting White House staff to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, obtained by Alayna Treene/Axios

A week into the job, President Biden's White House medical team has administered the coronavirus vaccine to several hundred staffers — and aims to vaccinate all in-person staff over the next few weeks, officials tell Axios.

Why it matters: The new administration is ramping up steps to protect President Biden and all staff working inside the White House complex. The administration is also requiring daily employee COVID tests and N95 masks at all times.

Cuomo asks New York AG and chief judge to choose "independent" investigator into sexual harassment claims

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo at a press conference on Feb. 24. Photo: Seth Wenig/pool/AFP via Getty Images

A special counselor to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo released a statement Sunday asking the state's attorney general and chief judge to jointly pick an "independent and qualified lawyer in private practice without political affiliation" to investigate claims of sexual harassment against the governor. The AG's office subsequently turned down the offer, saying it wants to conduct its own probe.

The state of play: The statement is an about-face from Cuomo, who had previously selected a former judge close to a top aide to lead the investigation, the New York Times reported, a move that was widely criticized.

Republican Sen. Sasse slams Nebraska GOP for "weird worship" of Trump after state party rebuke

Sen. Ben Sasse, (R-Neb.) Photo: Andrew Harnik - Pool/Getty Images

The Nebraska Republican Party on Saturday formally "rebuked" Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) for his vote to impeach former President Trump earlier this year, though it stopped short of a formal censure, CNN reports.

Why it matters: Sasse is the latest among a slate of Republicans who have faced some sort of punishment from their state party apparatus after voting to impeach the former president. The senator responded statement Saturday, per the Omaha World-Herald, saying "most Nebraskans don't think politics should be about the weird worship of one dude."