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Christie promotes his book Feb. 1 in New York. Photo: Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images

Chris Christie told Trump stories for nearly an hour last night at the Manhattan home of hedge fund billionaire Steven Cohen.

What he's saying: Standing in front of 10-foot-high windows on the first floor of a home that resembled a gallery of modern art, the former New Jersey governor said "the thing I’m proudest about" — now that his book, "Let Me Finish," has been out for two weeks — is that nobody he wrote about, some of whom still work in the White House, had dared to deny what he'd written.

  • "They know I know even more," Christie said. Christie pointed at Gary Cohn, Trump's former economic adviser, as he said this. Cohn nodded knowingly.

Later in his riff, Christie rattled off the jobs Trump had offered him that he’d turned down: "Secretary of Labor, twice. Secretary of Homeland Security, twice. Ambassador to Rome. Ambassador to the Vatican. And special assistant to the president."

  • Attendees included Peggy Noonan, Maggie Haberman, Andrew Ross Sorkin and K.T. McFarland.

Christie offered no predictions for the 2020 campaign, beyond saying that he thought Trump was the favorite to win.

  • But he said he thinks there’s a 2% chance Trump decides he's had enough, declares he'd accomplished more in three years than any president in history, and decides not to run.

👀 One thing to watch, according to Christie: Which Democrats will get Trump nicknames?

  • "If he respects you, you don’t get a nickname, because he’s afraid what's going to come back."
  • "So Cryin' Chuck Schumer gets a nickname, because [Trump] has no respect for Schumer."
  • "But Nancy Pelosi's got no nickname. It’s just Nancy. And if she doesn’t have a nickname by now, she ain't getting any."

Go deeper ... Exclusive excerpt: Chris Christie says Trump hired "riffraff"

Go deeper

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
7 mins ago - Technology

AI is industrializing

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Artificial intelligence is becoming a true industry, with all the pluses and minuses that entails, according to a sweeping new report.

Why it matters: AI is now in nearly every area of business, with the pandemic pushing even more investment in drug design and medicine. But as the technology matures, challenges around ethics and diversity grow.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

National Guard chief: Pentagon's "unusual" Jan. 6 restrictions led to 3-hour delay

William Walker, commanding general of the D.C. National Guard, testified Wednesday that a three-hour delay in approval for National Guard assistance during the Jan. 6 Capitol attack was exacerbated by "unusual" restrictions on his authorities by Pentagon leadership.

Why it matters: Walker testified that if Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy had not prohibited him in a Jan. 5 memo from using the National Guard's "Quick Reaction Force" without authorization, he would have "immediately" sent troops to the Capitol after receiving a "frantic call" from then-Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund.

2 hours ago - World

U.S.-Iran nuclear diplomacy is going nowhere fast

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Iran's cool response to the Biden administration's push for diplomatic engagement, along with rising tensions in the region, makes clear that salvaging the 2015 nuclear deal may be far more difficult than many had anticipated.

The state of play: Both the U.S. and Iran have entered the diplomatic dance, but it seems to be moving in circles.