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Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

A Chinese government-associated hacking group that shifted its focus this spring toward collecting intelligence involving coronavirus response has again reoriented its work, this time to target Tibetan dissidents, according to security firm Proofpoint.

Between the lines: China’s intelligence services may now feel that, with the initial COVID-19 crisis in both Europe and China now receding, they can return to older, core priorities.

Details: Proofpoint connected the most recent activity to the same Chinese group behind the coronavirus campaign because of shared email accounts employed during phishing campaigns, use of the same "new malware family," and the group’s historical targeting patterns.

  • This Chinese hacking group has a well-documented history of targeting Tibetan dissident and exile organizations. Chinese intelligence places great emphasis on tracking human rights figures and dissidents abroad — and Tibetan groups are among its top targets.
  • Until now, the group of late had been targeting “European diplomatic and legislative bodies, non-profit policy research organizations, and global organizations dealing with economic affairs” in response to the pandemic, Proofpoint says.

Context: The push for Tibetan autonomy is one of what the Chinese Communist Party calls the “Five Poisons” that it believes threaten national unity and its power.

  • The others are the assertion of Taiwanese independence, the call for Uighur rights, pro-democracy movements, and Falun Gong, a spiritual practice banned in China.
  • Keeping a close eye on these is a core feature of Beijing’s internal and external counterintelligence strategies, including its cyber espionage efforts.

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Nov 17, 2020 - World

Scoop: State Department to release Kennan-style paper on China

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The U.S. State Department's Office of Policy Planning is set to release a blueprint for America’s response to China’s rise as an authoritarian superpower, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: The lengthy document calls for strong alliances and rejuvenation of constitutional democracy. Axios obtained a copy.

47 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Bipartisan group of senators seeks coronavirus stimulus deal

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At least eight Republican and Democratic senators have formed an informal working group aimed at securing new coronavirus spending during the lame-duck session, a move favored by President-elect Biden, two sources familiar with the group tell Axios.

Why it matters: It may be the most significant bipartisan step toward COVID relief in months.

FCC chairman to depart in January

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Ajit Pai will leave his post as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission on Jan. 20, the agency said today.

Why it matters: Pai's Inauguration Day departure is in keeping with agency tradition, and could set up the Biden administration with a 2-1 Democratic majority at the FCC if the Senate fails to confirm another Trump nominee during the lame-duck period.