Reproduced from CivicScience; Chart: Axios Visuals

U.S. consumers are getting less concerned about the impact of tariffs on their daily lives, new data show.

What happening: After consumer concern about the tariffs rose to record highs in April and May, CivicScience noted a consistent decline that has pushed overall readings on concern down to nearly their levels before the pandemic began in the U.S.

By the numbers: For the full month of August, 65% of U.S. adults say they’re at least somewhat concerned about the impact of recent trade policies on their household expenses, down three points from 68% in the month of July.

What to watch: Tariffs are still in place on most Chinese exports to the U.S. and on many Chinese imports from the U.S., so businesses and consumers are still paying duties on hundreds of billions of dollars of goods.

  • Both sides in the U.S.-China trade war have pledged their commitment to the "phase one" trade deal, though President Trump has said he has no plans to negotiate a phase two.

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