Dec 1, 2018

5. China surveils electric cars and other tech news you missed

Tesla showroom in China. Photo: Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images.

Facebook stayed in the news this week as COO Sheryl Sandberg met with a civil rights group and her story continued to shift on her involvement with a political consulting firm's work. Here are five other stories in tech news this week that may have gotten lost in the Facebook drama.

Catch up quick: Electric vehicles in China are sending real-time data to the government; Instagram is now using AI to describe photos for users with visual impairments; misinformation bots are smarter than we thought; Facebook launched a local news aggregator; and carmakers at the L.A. auto show are pushing their tech, not their cars.

Electric vehicles in China send real-time data to the government (Associated Press)

  • Why it matters: Teslas and other electric vehicles in China are sending information about the precise location of cars to the government. The data collection adds "to the rich kit of surveillance tools available to the Chinese government as President Xi Jinping steps up the use of technology to track Chinese citizens," Sinocism's Bill Bishop writes in his Axios China newsletter.

Instagram is now using AI to describe photos for users with visual impairments (The Verge)

  • Why it matters: If users do not enter their own "alt text," Instagram will use image recognition technology to write its own description of a photo, then read the description of the photo aloud when someone scrolls by.

Misinformation bots are smarter than we thought

  • Why it matters: The studies suggest that bots are getting more adept at gaming social platforms, even as the platforms are making changes to weed them out. Bots are also getting better at avoiding detection. — Axios' Sara Fischer

Facebook launched its local news aggregator "Today In" (TechCrunch)

  • Why it matters: “Today In” began testing in January, and is now expanding to 400 small to medium-sized cities in the United States, as well as in Australia. Facebook will have to strike a balance between local news and alerts and its tendency to prioritize popular content. It's also one more avenue that the company have to police for fake news.

At L.A. auto show, carmakers are pushing their tech, not their cars

  • Why it matters: The auto industry is moving away from gasoline, steering wheels and personal ownership as cities get more crowded and polluted and people look to avoid the hassles of owning a car. The transition is going to be rocky for many traditional auto manufacturers, as we've seen at GM this week, but the consensus in L.A. is that personal mobility is approaching a tipping point. — Axios' Joann Muller

Go deeper

Debate night: Candidates' last face-off before Super Tuesday

Sanders, Biden, Klobuchar and Steyer in South Carolina on Feb. 25. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders wanted to keep his momentum after winning contests in New Hampshire and Nevada, while former Vice President Joe Biden hoped to keep his own campaign alive. The other five candidates were just trying to hang on.

What's happening: Seven contenders for the Democratic presidential nomination were in Charleston, South Carolina, for the tenth debate, just days before the South Carolina primary and a week before Super Tuesday. They spoke, sometimes over each other, about health care, Russian interference in the election, foreign policy the economy, gun control, marijuana, education, and race.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

4 takeaways from the South Carolina debate

Former Vice President Joe Biden, right, makes a point during Tuesday's Democratic presidential debate, while Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders listens. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

The 10th Democratic debate was billed as the most consequential of the primary thus far, but Tuesday night's high-stakes affair was at times awkward and unfocused as moderators struggled to rein in candidates desperate to make one last splash before Saturday's primary in South Carolina and Super Tuesday.

The big picture: After cementing himself as the Democratic favorite with a sweeping win in Nevada, Sen. Bernie Sanders came under fire as the front-runner for the first time on the debate stage. Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who will be on the ballot for the first time next Tuesday, was a progressive foil once again, but he appeared more prepared after taking a drubbing at the Nevada debate.

Coronavirus spreads to Africa as U.S. soldier in South Korea tests positive

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

A 23-year-old American soldier stationed at Camp Carroll in South Korea has tested positive to the novel coronavirus, as the outbreak spreads to more countries.

The big picture: COVID-19 has killed more than 2,700 people and infected over 80,000 others, mostly in mainland China. Public health officials confirmed Tuesday the U.S. has 57 people with the novel coronavirus, mostly those repatriated from the Diamond Princess cruise ship.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 3 hours ago - Health