Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

China's economic planning and targeted subsidies have increased the competitiveness of Chinese firms in the global economy to the direct detriment of U.S. industry, an academic study has found.

Why it matters: When it comes to American industries and workers, the rise of Chinese industrial policy hasn’t been a win-win — researchers found for every 100 factories opened in China, 12.5 U.S. factories in the same industry closed.

Details: Researchers at Columbia University and Boston College found that "high birth rates" of Chinese firms — meaning the opening of new factories and companies — negatively affected U.S. employment, in their April 2020 SSRN study.

What they're saying: "The key findings support the concern that U.S. firms are displaced by China’s manufacturing prowess, not just in 'sunset' industries from which the U.S. was happy to retreat, but also in industries that both countries are eager to lead, in a race that has been significantly shaped by the Chinese government."

The big picture: China's state-guided capitalism is increasingly showing itself to be a major challenge to a liberal global trade order premised on trading partners following a set of shared principles.

Go deeper: Beijing draws Chinese companies even closer

Go deeper

Oct 20, 2020 - World

Right-wing media falsely ties Black Lives Matter movement to Beijing

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Right-wing outlets and commentators have recently spread a false claim linking the Chinese Communist Party to the Black Lives Matter movement.

Why it matters: Such claims raise concerns that a real issue — that of Chinese government interference in U.S. politics — could be wrongly invoked along partisan lines to attack Americans engaging in legitimate activities.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Oct 20, 2020 - Energy & Environment

The U.S.-China climate rupture

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Well that, as Ron Burgundy would say, escalated quickly. China's foreign ministry is accusing the Trump administration of "major retrogression" on climate and being an environmental "troublemaker."

Why it matters: China's unusual statement Monday widens the rupture between the world's largest carbon emitters as global climate efforts are flagging and the pandemic's effect on emissions is too small to be consequential in the long term.

Oct 20, 2020 - Podcasts

China's post-COVID economic recovery

The Chinese government on Monday reported third-quarter GDP growth of 4.9%, year-over-year. This comes as the U.S. economy continues to be much weaker, year-over-year, given our relative inability to get COVID-19 under control.

Axios Re:Cap goes deeper into China's economy, including its increased focus on domestic demand, with CNBC Beijing bureau chief Eunice Yoon.

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