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China's Foreign Minister Wang Yi, who is reportedly scheduled to announce the country's new data security initiatvie, in Berlin, Germany on Sept. 1. Photo: Peng Dawei/Xinhua via Getty Images

China is set to announce its own global data security initiative on Tuesday, the Wall Street Journal reports, citing people briefed on the issue.

Why it matters: China's effort is aimed at countering U.S. attempts to bar Chinese technology from other countries, most recently through the Clean Network program announced last month, WSJ reports.

Driving the news: Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the Clean Network program as a guard for the U.S. and 30 other countries against "aggressive intrusions by malign actors, such as the Chinese Communist Party."

  • The program would "exclude Chinese telecommunications firms, apps, cloud providers and undersea cables from internet infrastructure" used by the U.S. and participating countries, per WSJ.
  • China's draft for its security initiative reportedly does not mention the Clean Network program or the U.S.

Of note: A federal grand jury returned an 11-count indictment against two Chinese hackers in July for a "sweeping global computer intrusion campaign" that began over 10 years ago and targeted companies developing coronavirus vaccines and treatments.

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
Nov 24, 2020 - World

Remote work shakes up geopolitics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The global adoption of remote work may leave the rising powers in the East behind.

The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.

USAID chief tests positive for coronavirus

An Air Force cargo jet delivers USAID supplies to Russia earlier this year. Photo: Mikhail Metzel/TASS via Getty Images

The acting administrator of the United States Agency for International Development informed senior staff Wednesday he has tested positive for coronavirus, two sources familiar with the call tell Axios.

Why it matters: John Barsa, who staffers say rarely wears a mask in their office, is the latest in a series of senior administration officials to contract the virus. His positive diagnosis comes amid broader turmoil at the agency following the election.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
5 hours ago - Health

COVID-19 shows a bright future for vaccines

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Promising results from COVID-19 vaccine trials offer hope not just that the pandemic could be ended sooner than expected, but that medicine itself may have a powerful new weapon.

Why it matters: Vaccines are, in the words of one expert, "the single most life-saving innovation ever," but progress had slowed in recent years. New gene-based technology that sped the arrival of the COVID vaccine will boost the overall field, and could even extend to mass killers like cancer.