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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Head Start programs may provide a model for how to implement coronavirus protections in child-care facilities, according to an analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Why it matters: The evidence so far suggests that schools and day care centers aren't responsible for large outbreaks, and can be kept open safely. But proper precautions are still necessary to keep them safe and to protect the adults who work there.

Details: The CDC took stock of the mitigation measures in Head Start programs in eight states.

  • In addition to some common interventions — including more frequent cleaning, mask mandates for staff, and some physical dividers in play areas — those programs offered flexible work schedules, including work-from-home options, especially for high-risk employees.

Yes, but: Head Start programs remained open because they had the federal funds and resources to implement these strategies. Child care centers that can't afford flexible staffing may still have to close their doors, especially as cases rise.

  • Nearly half of America's child care centers risk closures — a big economic risk for Black and Latina women, who make up 40% of the child care workforce, AP notes.

Go deeper

Updated Jan 18, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: CDC director defends agency's response to pandemic — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Empire State Building among hundreds to light up in Biden inauguration coronavirus tribute.
  3. Vaccine: Fauci: 100 million doses in 100 days is "absolutely" doable.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode again.
  5. Tech: Kids' screen time sees a big increase.
Erica Pandey, author of @Work
Jan 20, 2021 - Economy & Business

Work-wherever turns to work-whenever

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The pandemic killed the 9-to-5 workday for many.

The big picture: So much of our society — from after-school child care programs to the most coveted time slots for television shows — is structured around working from 9 to 5. But our countrywide experiment in remote work has demonstrated that the hours we are logged on don't matter as long as the work gets done.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
12 mins ago - Economy & Business

First glimpse of the Biden market

Photo: Jonathan Ernst-Pool/Getty Images

Investors made clear what companies they think will be winners and which will be losers in President Joe Biden's economy on Wednesday, selling out of gun makers, pot purveyors, private prison operators and payday lenders, and buying up gambling, gaming, beer stocks and Big Tech.

What happened: Private prison operator CoreCivic and private prison REIT Geo fell by 7.8% and 4.1%, respectively, while marijuana ETF MJ dropped 2% and payday lenders World Acceptance and EZCorp each fell by more than 1%.