Chief Justice John Roberts overseeing the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump. Photo: Senate Television via Getty Images

Chief Justice John Roberts was hospitalized overnight after a fall on June 21, a Supreme Court spokesperson confirmed to the Washington Post on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Speculation regarding justices' health — given their lifetime appointments — always runs rampant, and this incident may have not been made public if the Post hadn't "received a tip."

  • Roberts' fall at the Chevy Chase Club caused an injury to his head that required sutures.
  • The court did not initially notify the public because the "injury was not significant; he stayed overnight out of an abundance of caution and went home first thing in the morning," Kathy Arberg, the court's public information officer, told CNN.

The state of play: Roberts is 65 and has a history of seizures — in 1993 and 2007.

  • Arberg told the Post that seizures had been ruled out as a cause for this incident, saying doctors "believe the fall was likely due to light-headedness caused by dehydration."

The big picture: The news comes as the Supreme Court is working to finish its term, with opinions on five cases still outstanding, including those regarding President Trump's tax returns and financial records.

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Health care was by far the dominant issue in the Senate Judiciary Committee’s confirmation hearing yesterday for Judge Amy Coney Barrett.

The big picture: After promising for 10 years to get rid of the Affordable Care Act, and with a lawsuit pending at the Supreme Court that could do exactly that, Republicans are making a new argument: c’mon, nobody’s getting rid of the Affordable Care Act.

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  2. Business: New state unemployment filings fall.
  3. Economy: Why the stimulus delay isn't a crisis (yet).
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Early voting eclipses 2016 total with 12 days until election

People stand in line to vote early in Fairfax, Virginia in September. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Americans have cast more than 47.1 million ballots in the 2020 presidential election, surpassing the total early-vote count for 2016 with 12 days left until Election Day, according to a Washington Post analysis of voting data.

Why it matters: The election is already underway, as many states have expanded early and mail-in voting options because of the coronavirus pandemic.