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Police officers inspect a damaged Best Buy in Chicago that was looted and vandalized. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Local police officers are seeking felony charges in 25 cases following the arrest of 100 people in the wake of widespread looting and property damage in Chicago on Monday, per the Washington Post.

Driving the news: Law enforcement said the event involving hundreds of people was a coordinated response after an officer shot a suspect Sunday evening, according to CBS Chicago.

  • The office of Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx said Tuesday 24 felony charges relating to "aggravated battery of a police officer, criminal damage to property, unlawful use of a weapon and burglary/looting" had been approved and in bond.
  • Law enforcement is reviewing individual cases and more charges could be filed.

The big picture: Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot called the incident "brazen and extensive" and not a "protected First Amendment expression."

  • It disrupted transportation around the downtown area — with buses and CTA trains impacted into the morning hours on Tuesday. The city also took the step of raising bridges across the Chicago River to limit access downtown.

Of note: While the looting was centered around the city's Magnificent Mile shopping district, it eventually spread to the neighborhoods of River North, Streeterville, Lincoln Park, the Gold Coast and the South Loop, NBC Chicago reports.

What they're saying:

  • Brown: "This was not an organized protest. This was pure criminality — violence against police and our city," Brown said at a press conference Monday morning.
  • Lightfoot: "There is no justification for criminal behavior, ever. You have no right, no right, to take and destroy the property of others. Our residents deserve to be safe. Our businesses deserve to understand and enjoy safety and security of their property and in their employees. And our police officers deserve to be able to do their job without having to worry about shots being fired, projectiles being thrown and being maced."

Editor's note: This article has been updated with more details of the arrests and charges.

Go deeper

Retailers batten storefronts in anticipation of election turmoil

Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Retailers across the U.S. are boarding up their storefronts and tightening security ahead of predicted unrest in response to next week's election.

The big picture: Black Lives Matter protests earlier this year resulted in more than $1 billion worth of property damage. This time around businesses are hoping to avoid the same outcome if election results spark activism or conflict.

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.