Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Jemal Countess/Getty Images

Chelsea Clinton is in the very early stages of forming a venture capital firm, Axios has learned from multiple sources.

What we’re hearing: The working name is Metrodora Ventures, after the author of the first medical text known to have been written by a woman (around 2,000 years ago in Greece).

Behind the scenes: Clinton has been kicking around the idea for several months, and has committed to investing in at least two startups.

  • One of them is a pregnancy support app called Poppy Seed Health.
  • Clinton is making the early commitments personally, and would roll them into the fund if it gets raised.
  • Also involved is Caroline Kassie, currently a partner with Blockchange Ventures, who plans to join Metrodora in the future.

To reiterate, the best way to describe Metrodora right now is embryonic.

  • Clinton is said to have not decided yet if she wants this to be her next full-time career move, but there is at least a draft pitch deck floating around and "Metrodora Ventures" was registered in New York back in April.
  • Plus, a Twitter account was just created which describes Metrodora as a "values conscious venture capital firm focused on health and learning businesses."
  • Clinton once worked at hedge fund Avenue Capital, and currently sits on the boards of Expedia Group, IAC/Interactive Corp., and VC-backed startups Clover Health and Nurx.

Clinton, through a spokesperson, declined comment.

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