Nov 3, 2018

Cell phone battery life is getting worse

Photo: Anton Novoderezhkin\TASS via Getty Images.

The battery-life from the new models of cell phones are underperforming their previous models, Washington Post tech columnist Geoffrey Fowler writes.

The details: Fowler performed the same battery test for 13 phones and his findings show battery life doesn't match up to what phone makers advertise. The new iPhone XS died 21 minutes earlier than last year’s iPhone X. Google’s Pixel 3 lasted nearly an hour and a half less than its Pixel 2.

Why it matters: Phone companies are trying to keep up with the demands of high-resolution screens, more complicated apps and "our seeming inability to put the darn phone down," per the Post. New phone features like better processors, low-power modes and AI have tried to keep battery life under control for users.

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Situational awareness

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  1. Warren supporters form super PAC
  2. We may be on "the brink" of a global coronavirus pandemic
  3. Pentagon policy chief resigns amid reported discord with Trump
  4. National polls show Bernie in control ahead of Nevada
  5. How a Chinese think tank rates all 50 U.S. governors

Sign of the times: A pro-Warren super PAC

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren at a rally in Nevada. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

A group of women progressives who back Sen. Elizabeth Warren has formed Persist PAC, a super PAC airing pro-Warren ads starting Wednesday in an effort to boost her performance ahead of Saturday's crucial Nevada caucuses, a spokesman told Axios.

Why it matters: Warren has spoken adamantly against the influence of unlimited spending and dark money in politics. But these supporters have concluded that before Warren can reform the system, she must win under the rules that exist — and that whether she likes it or not, their uncoordinated help may be needed to keep her viable through this weekend's contest and into South Carolina and Super Tuesday.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Pentagon policy chief resigns amid reported discord with Trump

John Rood. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

John Rood, the Pentagon's top policy official, will resign from his post on Feb. 28, CNN first reported and President Trump confirmed.

The state of play: CNN said Rood "was perceived as not embracing some of the changes in policy the White House and senior Pentagon officials wanted," such as peace talks in Afghanistan with the Taliban and a decision to cut back on military exercises with South Korea as the president courted North Korea's Kim Jong-un.