Apr 25, 2019

Everything's deadlier in the South

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Data: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2017 data; Interactive: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

The death rates from pretty much every major cause — heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer's, diabetes, suicide, sepsis, guns, infant mortality — remain highest in the South, according to updated data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Between the lines: Rural Appalachia has higher death rates from drug overdoses. But a lot of the poorest health outcomes in the South reflect longstanding poverty, fewer health care resources and longstanding barriers to care.

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Raising the minimum wage can prevent suicide

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Raising the minimum wage by just $1 in each state could have prevented more than 27,000 suicides between 1990 and 2015, according to a new report in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health reported on by NPR.

Between the lines: Increasing the minimum wage would be especially helpful when unemployment is high, the authors found.

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020

Big Tech data centers probably aren't a climate change time bomb

Data: Reproduced from an International Energy Agency report; Chart: Axios Visuals

An International Energy Agency analysis pushes back against concerns that data centers are a ticking carbon bomb as use of web-connected devices expands.

Where it stands: Power use by data centers consumes about 1% of global power (which isn't trivial in a world of still-rising emissions) and has changed little since 2015, they report.

Go deeperArrowJan 7, 2020

Cancer death rates drop by largest amount on record in U.S.

Photo: Harry Sieplinga/Getty Images

American Cancer Society researchers revealed in a new report published Wednesday that the U.S. cancer death rate dropped 2.2% between 2016 and 2017, the largest decline recorded in national cancer statistics dating back to 1930, AP reports.

The big picture via Axios' Bob Herman: Lung cancer drove most of the decline, as fewer people smoke cigarettes, and advanced lung cancer treatments become standard. Lung cancer accounts for nearly a quarter of all cancer deaths, according to the lead author of the report, Rebecca Siegel.

Go deeperArrowJan 8, 2020