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Data: CDC; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Race and ethnicity data were spotty during the first month of coronavirus vaccinations, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Why it matters: Collecting accurate demographic data will become more important as vaccines become available to the general public, where the pandemic has taken a disproportionate toll on Black and Hispanic Americans.

By the numbers: No demographic data was available for about half of the initial vaccinations, and the CDC cautioned against drawing firm conclusions from the data that were available.

  • Many of the demographic data from the first month of vaccinations mirror the demographics of the two groups eligible for those initial vaccines — health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities.
  • Vaccine recipients in the first month were mostly female, and 40% were non-white. Roughly 13% of the health care workforce is Hispanic, according to the CDC — as were 12% of the people vaccinated in the first month.
  • Black Americans appear to be under-represented, relative to their share of the health care workforce and long-term care population — but people checking the "other" box were dramatically over-represented, making it hard to reach broad conclusions, the CDC said.

What's next: The Biden administration has included race and ethnicity in new reporting requirements, and that will be key to tracking America's progress — or lack of progress — on racial disparities.

Go deeper

Feb 1, 2021 - Health

Chilling trend: A longer, deadlier pandemic

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Mutated versions of the coronavirus threaten to prolong the pandemic, perhaps for years — killing more people and deepening the global economic crisis in the process.

The big picture: The U.S. and the world are in a race to control the virus before these variants can gain a bigger foothold. But many experts say they already expect things to get worse before they get better. And that also means an end to the pandemic may be getting further away.

Updated 12 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Rae Cook/Axios

  1. Health: CDC expects new COVID surge starting this month — U.S. fertility dips to its lowest rate since the 1970s.
  2. Politics: Federal judge overturns CDC's eviction moratorium — Why Biden's latest vaccine goal is his hardest yet.
  3. Vaccines: Moderna says its COVID booster shot shows promise against variants — U.S. will support waiving vaccine patentsPfizer to offer smaller shipments.
  4. Economy: U.S. may have added more than 2 million jobs in April — A surge in youth unemployment.
  5. World: U.S. could fill "vaccine diplomacy" void as other powers struggle — The countries facing massive COVID surges.
  6. Variant tracker: Where different strains are spreading.

10 Senate Republicans propose compromise on COVID relief package

Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

A group of 10 Senate Republicans, led by Sen. Susan Collins (Maine), sent a letter to President Biden Sunday requesting a meeting, saying they have developed a counterproposal to the president's COVID-19 relief plan.

The big picture: The proposal includes $160 billion in spending for vaccines, testing and tracing, treatment and medical equipment. The senators said the plan "could be approved quickly by Congress with bipartisan support," if it gained Biden's support.