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Photo: David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

The CDC on Monday updated its guidance to acknowledge that COVID-19 can be spread through the air, particularly in poorly ventilated areas.

Why it matters: Consensus has grown that the coronavirus can be spread via lingering particles and droplets in the air by people more than six feet apart under certain conditions — though the CDC still says that spread mainly occurs through close contact with an infected person via larger respiratory droplets produced by coughing, sneezing or talking.

  • The update follows an error from the agency last month when the updated guidance was accidentally published without review.

What they're saying: "Today’s update acknowledges the existence of some published reports showing limited, uncommon circumstances where people with COVID-19 infected others who were more than six feet away or shortly after the COVID-19-positive person left an area," the agency said.

  • "In these instances, transmission occurred in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces that often involved activities that caused heavier breathing, like singing or exercise. Such environments and activities may contribute to the buildup of virus-carrying particles."

Go deeper

Jan 12, 2021 - Health

Scoop: The Trump administration's plan to speed up vaccinations

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Trump administration is set to deliver new guidelines today that will get coronavirus vaccinations moving much faster.

Driving the news: New federal guidelines will recommend opening up the process to everyone older than 65, and will also aim to move doses out the door rather than holding some back.

Updated Jan 12, 2021 - Health

Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine expected to provide immunity for at least 1 year

Photo: Mario Tama via Getty

Moderna's coronavirus vaccine will provide immunity from the disease for at least one year, the biotech company said Monday per Reuters.

Why it matters: Moderna's vaccine is one of two now authorized for emergency use in the U.S., as coronavirus cases surge past 22.5 million nationally and 90.8 million globally.

Focus group: Former Trump voters say he should never hold office again

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

"Relief" is the top emotion some swing voters who used to support Donald Trump say they felt as they watched President Biden's swearing-in, followed by "hope."

Why it matters: For voters on the bubble between parties, this moment is less about excitement for Biden or liberal politics than exhaustion and disgust with Trump and a craving for national healing. Most said Trump should be prohibited from ever holding office again.