Nov 22, 2017

CBS will cut off Dish signal for customers over Thanksgiving weekend

AP Photo/Mary Altaffer

CBS will air NFL football on Thursday (Cowboys v. Chargers) and other NFL and SEC games over the weekend, but will black out the signal for Dish customers in 18 markets until their contract dispute with Dish is resolved.

Why it matters: Consumers in affected markets will be unable to access content because of a fight that has nothing to do with them. In this case, consumers will be blocked from mostly sports and family content, but in other instances, these types of fights have resulted in blackouts of programming about weather emergencies in hurricane-ravaged areas.

These types of contract disputes are growing more frequent between Pay-TV providers, like Dish, and broadcast or cable networks, like CBS, as networks increase carriage fees to subsidize rising programming costs. According to the American Television Alliance, 2017 will by far have more TV blackouts than any other year prior.

  • 212 blackouts in 2017 (and counting)
  • 104 blackouts in 2016
  • 193 blackouts in 2015
  • 94 blackouts in 2014
  • 119 blackouts in 2013
  • 90 blackouts in 2012
  • 42 blackouts in 2011
  • 8 blackouts in 2010

Go deeper

Morgan Stanley to buy E*Trade in a $13 billion deal

Photo: Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Morgan Stanley is buying E*Trade Financial, the company known for helping everyday Americans manage their money, in a $13 billion all-stock deal, the investment bank said Thursday.

Why it matters: The deal signals Morgan Stanley's desire to bulk up in wealth management, a strong profit arm of its business model. As the WSJ notes, Wall Street banks have been looking for steadier sources of revenue, now that "postcrisis regulations and a long period of eerie calm in the markets" have taken a toll on profits.

The rise and rise of ransomware

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Ransomware attacks are becoming smarter, more common, and more dangerous.

What's happening: In ransomware incidents, attackers take systems down and demand payment (usually in bitcoin) to restore access to them.

Trump administration backs Oracle in Google fight

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo via The Washington Post.

The Trump administration is siding with Oracle in the database giant's dispute with Google before the Supreme Court — a move that comes as Oracle's founder hosts a high-dollar fundraiser for the president.

Why it matters: Billions of dollars — and, Google argues, the future of software innovation — are at stake as a long-running copyright dispute between the two giant companies heads to the Supreme Court next month.