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Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

It’s been several years since so-called "coding bootcamps" first emerged, and with a growing number of them today, one-year-old startup Career Karma wants to guide potential students to the right one for them.

The bottom line: All coding bootcamps aren't created equal.

Driving the news: Career Karma, which participated in Y Combinator's startup accelerator program earlier this year, tells Axios that it has raised a total of just under $2 million in funding from a number of investors, including Kapor Capital, Unshackled Ventures, and Backstage Capital, among many others.

How it works:

  • Potential students take a quiz that assesses their preferences (full-time vs. part-time, online vs. in person, etc.).
  • They then take part in a 21-day program that guides them through resources to get ready for the bootcamps' interviews and technical assessments and connects them to alumni for extra help.
  • If a prospective student enrolls in a bootcamp they found through Career Karma, the startup gets a cut of the tuition (and a bit more if the student ultimately lands a job after the program).
  • Enrolled students are placed into a "squad" with a few others to give them a peer support group even if they're not in the same coding bootcamp or city.
  • Eventually Career Karma wants to roll out more resources and information about the bootcamps.

"The reason they get accepted is because the schools give us the requirements," Career Karma CEO Ruben Harris, who founded the startup a year ago with brothers Timur and Artur Meyster, tells Axios. "Some schools even send us their rejects to nurture them" and help them re-apply, he adds.

  • Harris also says that it helps the coding bootcamps cut down on their costs to attract new students since his company acts as a funnel.
  • The startup now has more than 16,000 registered users, and more than 50 of them enroll in a bootcamp every month, says Harris.

Career Karma's emphasis on peer support and community may turn out to be its secret weapon as it emerges at a time of growing labor anxiety.

  • "For a lot of folks … nobody has ever told them that they're worth something," says Harris, adding that most Career Karma users are people of color, 25 and up.
  • At the same time, the company has to balance the reality that a career as a professional software developer may not fit everyone — something Harris says often becomes clear when potential students don’t make it through the 21-day program, a test of commitment and work ethic.

The bigger picture: Though his company is focused on coding bootcamps at the moment, Harris says the plan is to expand the approach to other skills and fields over time. He predicts that non-technical roles will remain a bigger segment of the jobs of the future.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 3 hours ago - World

U.S. releases report finding Saudi prince approved Khashoggi operation

Photo: Bandar Algaloud / Saudi Kingdom Council / Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) has released an unclassified report assessing that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) approved the operation to "capture or kill" Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi in 2018.

Driving the news: The White House also announced sanctions on entities implicated in the murder, though not on MBS directly. Officials also announced a new "Khashoggi ban" under which individuals accused of harassing journalists or dissidents outside their borders can be barred from entering the U.S.

About 20% of U.S. adults have received first vaccine dose, White House says

Joe Biden speaks during an event commemorating the 50 million COVID-19 vaccine shots. Photo: Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

Nearly 1 in 5 adults and nearly half of Americans 65 and older have received their first dose of the coronavirus vaccine, White House senior adviser Andy Slavitt said on Friday.

The big picture: The Biden administration has previously said it has secured enough doses to vaccinate most of the American population by the end of July.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Most COVID-19 survivors can weather risk of reinfection, study says — "Twindemic" averted as flu reports plummet amid coronavirus crisis
  2. Vaccine: Employers mull COVID vaccine requirements — New data reignites the debate over coronavirus vaccine strategyPfizer begins study on 3rd vaccine dose as booster shot against new strains.
  3. Economy: What's really going on with the labor market.
  4. Local: All adult Minnesotans will likely be eligible for COVID-19 vaccine by summer — Another wealthy Florida community receives special access to COVID-19 vaccine.
  5. Sports: Poll weighs impact of athlete vaccination.