Justin Trudeau speaks at the closing ceremony marking the conclusion of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Photo: Andrew Meade/AFP/Getty Images

A Canadian government inquiry into the deaths and disappearances of more than 1,000 indigenous women in recent decades has deemed the situation a "genocide," blaming long-standing "colonial and discriminatory policies" for the tragedy.

Driving the news: The inquiry, launched by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's administration in 2016, issued its final report Monday. The 1,200-page report details how the marginalization of indigenous women led to safety issues that subjected them to increased levels of violence, which had become normalized. The report also issued several calls to action to address the "crisis."

"This violence amounts to a race-based genocide of Indigenous Peoples, including First Nations, Inuit, and Métis, which especially targets women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people.”
— Volume 1a of the report

Context: 2SLGBTQQIA includes members of the two-spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, queer, intersexual and asexual communities, according to Reuters.

Why it matters: Per 2016 census data, native people make up 4.9% of Canada's total population and are growing at nearly four times the rate of non-native populations since 2006. Yet like many colonized nations, rifts still exist between native populations and state governments. This inquiry is one step toward understanding and addressing that issue.

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Trump's new TikTok threat

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump said twice Monday that the U.S. Treasury would need to get a portion of the sale price of TikTok, as a condition of regulatory approval.

Why it matters: This is akin to extortion — the sort of thing you'd expect to hear on a wiretap, not from the White House in front of reporters.

Ford names James Farley as new CEO amid ongoing turnaround effort

James Hackett, left, is retiring as Ford CEO. Jim Farley, right, takes over Oct. 1. Photo: Ford

Ford announced Tuesday that James Farley will take over as its next CEO, replacing James Hackett, 65, who is retiring after three years in the job.

Why it matters: It leaves Farley to complete the company's ongoing turnaround effort. The transition will be that much harder as the industry tries to navigate the coronavirus-induced economic slowdown which shuttered Ford plants for two months on the eve of some of its most important vehicle launches.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Watch the full "Axios on HBO" interview with President Trump

In this episode of “Axios on HBO”, President Trump discusses his handling of the coronavirus pandemic, the upcoming election and much more with National Political Correspondent Jonathan Swan.

The interview was filmed on Tuesday, July 28 and aired Monday, Aug. 3 on HBO.