Justin Trudeau speaks at the closing ceremony marking the conclusion of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Photo: Andrew Meade/AFP/Getty Images

A Canadian government inquiry into the deaths and disappearances of more than 1,000 indigenous women in recent decades has deemed the situation a "genocide," blaming long-standing "colonial and discriminatory policies" for the tragedy.

Driving the news: The inquiry, launched by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's administration in 2016, issued its final report Monday. The 1,200-page report details how the marginalization of indigenous women led to safety issues that subjected them to increased levels of violence, which had become normalized. The report also issued several calls to action to address the "crisis."

"This violence amounts to a race-based genocide of Indigenous Peoples, including First Nations, Inuit, and Métis, which especially targets women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people.”
— Volume 1a of the report

Context: 2SLGBTQQIA includes members of the two-spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, queer, intersexual and asexual communities, according to Reuters.

Why it matters: Per 2016 census data, native people make up 4.9% of Canada's total population and are growing at nearly four times the rate of non-native populations since 2006. Yet like many colonized nations, rifts still exist between native populations and state governments. This inquiry is one step toward understanding and addressing that issue.

Go deeper

Hurricane Zeta makes landfall in Mexico ahead of expected arrival in U.S.

Hurricane Zeta's forecast path. Photo: National Hurricane Center

Hurricane Zeta made landfall on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula as a Category 1 storm late Monday packing maximum sustained winds of 80 mph, per the National Hurricane Center.

The state of play: Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) declared a state of emergency Monday as Zeta strengthened into a hurricane earlier Monday.

Updated 58 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: The swing states where the pandemic is raging — Pence no longer expected to attend Barrett confirmation vote after COVID exposure.
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day case records last week
  3. Business: Where stimulus is needed most.
  4. Education: The dangerous instability of school re-openings.
  5. States: Nearly two dozen Minnesota COVID cases traced to 3 Trump campaign events
  6. World: Unrest in Italy as restrictions grow across Europe.
  7. Media: Fox News president and several hosts advised to quarantine.
Updated 1 hour ago - World

In photos: Unrest in Italy as coronavirus restrictions grow across Europe

An anti-government demonstration against the economic consequences of the new measures in Turin, Italy, where luxury stores were "ransacked," on Oct. 26, the Guardian reports. Photo: Diego Puletto/Getty Images

Protests in Italy against fresh COVID-19 pandemic restrictions that came into effect Monday descended into violence in Milan and and Turin, where police used tear gas to disperse demonstrators, per the Guardian.

The big picture: The protests in Italian cities still reeling from the first lockdown mark some of the biggest resistance against measures seen yet as restrictions return across Europe, which is facing a second coronavirus wave. From Denmark to Romania, this is what's been happening, in photos.