Jun 28, 2018

California governor signs data privacy law

California's state capitol building. Photo: Rolf Schulten/ullstein bild via Getty Images

California's governor has signed a bill placing new data privacy restrictions on companies like Google and Facebook that will go into effect in 2020.

Why it matters: The approval of the law heads off a ballot measure on the same issue that was moving toward a statewide vote in the November election — its supporters agreed to pull the measure if the law was approved.

What it does: The law allows consumers to ask companies about the data collected on them and to demand that it be deleted. It also includes provisions meant to protect consumers in the event of a data breach.

What they're saying: Real estate developer Alastair Mactaggart, the prime backer of the privacy ballot measure, said that the law was "the strictest privacy bill, grants consumers the most rights, ever achieved in this country.”

The differences: The law and the ballot measure are similar in many ways, but the law is slightly more favorable to companies in its handling of the rules surrounding private lawsuits.

What's next?: The delay in the law's implementation leaves some wiggle room for different parties, including the industry, to push for changes.

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Updated 7 mins ago - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: What you need to know

Photo: David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Clashes erupted between police and protesters in several major U.S. cities Saturday night as demonstrations over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black men spread across the country.

The big picture: Floyd's death in Minneapolis police custody is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.

Massive demonstrations put police response to unrest in the spotlight

Washington State Police use tear gas to disperse a crowd in Seattle during a demonstration protesting the death of George Floyd. Photo: Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

The response of some officers during demonstrations against police brutality in the U.S. has been criticized for being excessive by some officials and Black Lives Matter leaders.

Why it matters: The situation is tense across the U.S., with reports of protesters looting and burning buildings. While some police have responded with restraint and by monitoring the protests, others have used batons, tear gas, rubber bullets and other devices to disperse protesters and, in some cases, journalists.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

U.S. cities crack down on protesters

The scene near the 5th police precinct during a demonstration calling for justice for George Floyd in Minneapolis on Saturday. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

Major U.S. cities have implemented curfews and called on National Guard to mobilize as thousands of demonstrators gather across the nation to continue protesting the death of George Floyd.

The state of play: Hundreds have already been arrested as tensions continue to rise between protesters and local governments. Protesters are setting police cars on fire as freeways remain blocked and windows are shattered, per the Washington Post. Law enforcement officials are using tear gas and rubber bullets to try to disperse crowds and send protesters home.