Jun 28, 2018

California governor signs data privacy law

California's state capitol building. Photo: Rolf Schulten/ullstein bild via Getty Images

California's governor has signed a bill placing new data privacy restrictions on companies like Google and Facebook that will go into effect in 2020.

Why it matters: The approval of the law heads off a ballot measure on the same issue that was moving toward a statewide vote in the November election — its supporters agreed to pull the measure if the law was approved.

What it does: The law allows consumers to ask companies about the data collected on them and to demand that it be deleted. It also includes provisions meant to protect consumers in the event of a data breach.

What they're saying: Real estate developer Alastair Mactaggart, the prime backer of the privacy ballot measure, said that the law was "the strictest privacy bill, grants consumers the most rights, ever achieved in this country.”

The differences: The law and the ballot measure are similar in many ways, but the law is slightly more favorable to companies in its handling of the rules surrounding private lawsuits.

What's next?: The delay in the law's implementation leaves some wiggle room for different parties, including the industry, to push for changes.

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Armed with subpoenas, lawsuits and immigration SWAT teams, the Trump administration has declared war on sanctuary cities.

The big picture: President Trump and his administration have used every available tool to try to crack down on local governments that refuse to hold immigrants in criminal custody, block immigration agents from working in county jails or deny federal authorities access to immigrants' records.

Peter Thiel's Founders Fund isn't really Peter Thiel's Founders Fund

Illustration: Photo Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Charles Eshelman, Steve Jennings, and Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Founders Fund has raised $3 billion for a pair of new funds, so expect a slew of headlines about how "Peter Thiel's venture capital firm" is now flush with cash.

Behind the scenes: Thiel is essential to Founders Fund, but he's not autocratic. Instead, Axios has learned that he's one of three people with veto power over most FF investments, and is unable to do a deal without approval of the other two.