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Body camera footage of Mario Arenales Gonzalez in Alameda, Calif., courtesy of the City of Alameda.

A man in California died in police custody April 19 after Alameda Police Department officers pinned him facedown for nearly five minutes, as shown by body camera footage released Tuesday, the New York Times reports.

The big picture: The death of Mario Arenales Gonzalez, 26, came the day before former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was convicted of murder and manslaughter charges over George Floyd's death. Chauvin pinned Floyd to the pavement by holding a knee to his neck.

  • Gonzalez's death also comes nearly a month after Chicago police shot and killed Adam Toledo, a 13-year-old Mexican American. Attorneys and Latino community leaders have asked for a federal investigation into Toledo's death.

The video shows officers detaining Gonzalez, and they can be heard asking him to stop resisting arrest before appearing to pin him down for about four and a half minutes. They began chest compressions on Gonzalez and checked for a pulse after he became unresponsive.

State of play: Three officers — Cameron Leahy, Eric McKinley, and James Fisher — are on administrative leave following Gonzalez's death, per the Times, and the Alameda County District Attorney's Office and the Alameda County Sheriff's Office each have investigations underway.

  • A separate investigation is being led by Louise Renne, a former California Deputy Attorney General and president of the San Francisco Police Commission.

What they're saying: “Alameda police officers murdered my brother,” Gerardo Gonzalez said at a Tuesday press conference.

  • The initial Alameda police report claims that "physical altercation ensued" after officers tried to arrest Gonzalez, and that he "had a medical emergency" as he was being detained and later died at a local hospital.
  • Julia Sherwin, a lawyer representing the family of Gonzalez, compared the initial Alameda police report to how Minneapolis police first described Floyd's death — which made no mention of the kind of force Chauvin used on the 46-year-old Black man.

Editor's note: This story has been corrected to state that Gonzalez died on April 19.

Go deeper

Aug 3, 2021 - Axios Twin Cities

National Night Out block parties return to the Twin Cities

Photo courtesy of National Night Out

COVID-19 wiped out many of last summer's National Night Out block parties, but neighbors across the country are heading back to the streets tonight.

How it works: Neighbors who register with their cities can typically block off a street to hold a potluck.

Why it matters: It's a great way to meet and reconnect with your community.

  • NNO has also historically been a time when officers visit neighborhoods and build relationships. But it comes as police-community relations have changed dramatically nationwide in recent years, particularly following the murder of George Floyd.

By the numbers: In Minneapolis, residents have registered 1,407 block parties, which is more than the 1,371 events held in the pre-pandemic 2019, according to city spokesperson Casper Hill. (About 1,000 registered for a makeup National Night Out in September 2020, he said.)

  • St. Paul has 285 registrations for NNO parties this year, up from 86 last year but still down from 379 in 2019, said St. Paul Police Department spokesperson Steve Linders.

What they're saying: Linders said the police department is planning a typical number of officer visits to parties.

  • "Officers really look forward to visiting the events," he said.
  • Minneapolis police will also make appearances, said spokesperson John Elder. Though, they likely won't be able to attend as many given the officer shortage, he said.

Meanwhile, critics of traditional policing are hosting their own counter-programming, billed as an opportunity to "redefine and re-imagine what public safety means for our communities."

  • The Yes 4 Minneapolis campaign, which is backing a November charter amendment to disband MPD and replace it with a new division of public safety, is holding an afternoon event as part of the competing Night Out for Safety and Liberation.
  • While some supporters will host their own community events, others are encouraged to bring the message back to NNO gatherings, spokesperson JaNaé Bates told us.
  • "Just having a one-off day in the middle of summer in the hope that will smooth over decades of harm between police entities and communities isn't useful," Bates said. "But what is really great is having a time for neighbors to connect with each other."

What else is different: There's a pandemic still going on, and some block parties are skipping the potluck.

📸 Are you participating in National Night Out or an alternative event?

Third police officer who responded to Jan. 6 Capitol riot dies by suicide

Members of the U.S. Capitol Police rush to respond to rioters on Jan. 6, 2021. Photo: Ting Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A Washington, D.C. police officer who responded to the Jan. 6 Capitol riot died by suicide last week, a spokesperson for the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department has confirmed.

Why it matters: Officer Gunther Hashida is the third police officer known to have died by suicide after defending the Capitol building during the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.

Congress to award Congressional Gold Medals to officers who protected Capitol

Photo: DEA/M. Borchi/Contributor via Getty Images

The Senate passed a bill via unanimous consent on Tuesday to award four Congressional Gold Medals to the Capitol Police and other law enforcement officers who responded to the Jan. 6 riot.

Details: Medals will be awarded to the Capitol Police and to the D.C. Metropolitan Police. Another medal will be displayed at the Smithsonian to honor the officers who responded to the riot, and a fourth will be put on display in the Capitol building.