Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

The area where a commercial scuba boat departed before catching fire in Santa Barbara, California, Sunday. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The final missing victim of the Conception dive boat fire that killed 34 people in Southern California was located Wednesday, the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Office confirmed in a Twitter post.

The latest: DNA testing was still being conducted to confirm identities of 7 of the victims from the Sept. 2 scuba diving tragedy, the Sheriff's office said. The FBI and other agencies searched Sunday the offices and 2 remaining vessels of the boat's owner, Truth Aquatics, per the Los Angeles Times reports.

  • The search was part of investigations into whether any crimes had been committed, Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Lt. Erik Raney said, per AP.

What we know so far, per AP:

  • 39 passengers and crew had departed aboard the boat Conception from Santa Barbara’s Channel Islands Harbor on Saturday for a Labor Day weekend scuba-diving trip.
  • The fire aboard the diving vessel Conception started about 3 a.m. local time as the boat was anchored in Platt Harbor, near the coast of Santa Cruz Island.
  • 33 people sleeping below deck and 1 crew member were killed in the fire.
  • 5 crew members were already awake and jumped off the bridge, Coast Guard Capt. Monica Rochester said at a press conference.
  • By the time the Coast Guard got the mayday call, the boat was already engulfed in flames.
  • Authorities released audio of the distress call to California news outlets in which a person claiming to be the captain tells says he "can’t breathe." He later says there’s "no escape hatch for any of the people on board."

What we don't know: The cause of the fire, and whether the crew tried to help any of the passengers.

Editor's note: This article has been updated with the latest information on the tragedy.

Go deeper

Updated 9 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump grants flurry of last-minute pardons

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty

President Trump issued 73 pardons and commuted the sentences of 70 individuals early Wednesday, 11 hours from leaving office.

Why it matters: It's a last-minute gift to some of the president's loyalists and an evident use of executive power with only hours left of his presidency. Axios reported in December that Trump planned to grant pardons to "every person who ever talked to me."

54 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump revokes ethics order barring former aides from lobbying

Photo: Spencer Platt via Getty

Shortly after pardoning members of Congress and lobbyists convicted on corruption charges, President Trump revoked an executive order barring former officials from lobbying for five years after leaving his administration.

Why it matters: The order, which was signed eight days after he took office, was an attempt to fulfill his campaign promise to "drain the swamp."

  • But with less than 12 hours left in office, Trump has now removed those limitations on his own aides.

Trump pardons former fundraiser Elliott Broidy

President Trump has pardoned Elliott Broidy, a former top Republican fundraiser who pleaded guilty late last year to conspiring to violate foreign lobbying laws as part of a campaign to sway the administration on behalf of Chinese and Malaysian interests.

Why it matters: Broidy was a deputy finance chair for the Republican National Committee early in Trump’s presidency, and attempted to leverage his influence in the Trump administration on behalf of his clients. The president's decision to pardon Broidy represents one last favor for a prominent political ally.