Herman Cain. Photo: Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Herman Cain told Fox News' "Hannity" Tuesday sexual harassment allegations leveled against him formed no part of his decision to withdraw from the Federal Reserve's board consideration after President Trump's nomination.

"Those accusations had nothing to do with my decision. My decision was driven by ... collecting all the information, and also finding out from administration staffers the things that I could and could not do. When I started to look at the list of things that I could not do, that is like taking a stallion, keeping him in the stable, and not let him run."

Details: Cain told Fox News host Sean Hannity if he had become federal reserve governor, he couldn't do the things he enjoys.

"I would have been limited in terms of what I could talk about and tell people the truth. Whereas, in this environment, I am unlimited in being able to say what I want, when I want, to whomever if I want ..."

The backdrop: Cain's potential nomination to the Fed already faced pushback from Republican senators due to sexual assault allegations, which he has previously denied.

Go deeper

Official says White House political appointees "commandeered" Bolton book review

John Bolton's book "The Room Where it Happened." Photo: Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

A former career official at the National Security Council claims her pre-publication review of former national security adviser John Bolton's explosive book on President Trump was "commandeered by political appointees for a seemingly political purpose," according to a letter from her lawyers filed in court on Tuesday.

Why it matters: The White House fought against the publication of Bolton's book for most of the year on the grounds that it contained harmful and "significant amounts of classified information."

House Democrats unveil sweeping reforms package to curtail presidential abuses

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Photo by Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

House Democrats on Wednesday unveiled sweeping legislation aimed at preventing presidential abuse and corruption, strengthening transparency and accountability, and protecting elections from foreign interference.

Why it matters: While the bill has practically no chance of becoming law while Trump is in office and Republicans hold the Senate, it's a pre-election message from Democrats on how they plan to govern should Trump lose in November. It also gives Democratic members an anti-corruption platform to run on in the weeks before the election.

TikTok's content-moderation time bomb

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

When the dust finally clears from the fight over TikTok, whoever winds up running the burgeoning short-video-sharing service is likely to face a world of trouble trying to manage speech on it.

Why it matters: Facebook’s story already shows us how much can go wrong when online platforms beloved by passionate young users turn into public squares.

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