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Photo: Joe Raedle via Getty Images

Tech firms and business groups are reaching out to the Biden camp and preparing for life under a new administration, even as many Republicans refuse to acknowledge President Trump's loss, gumming up the Biden team's formal transition.

Why it matters: Trump and those in his orbit are refusing to give up on the idea that he will get a second term, but the rest of the world is looking to January and a Biden administration, make sure their priorities are known.

  • The moves also help add institutional support to the election results, even as President Trump and others refuse to recognize the outcome, asserting — without evidence — claims of fraud.

The big picture: Dozens of businesses have congratulated President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris on their win and are laying out legislative and policy priorities.

  • "Our view is that it's important to plan ahead, perhaps now more than ever, given the crisis that the country is facing," Christopher Padilla, a Bush administration alum and head of government affairs for IBM, told reporters on a call Tuesday.
  • "It's very, very important for the good of the country that we come together and unify and get on with the business of tackling the pandemic," he said. "The election was hard fought. But the result is clear."

What they're saying: Business Roundtable and the Chamber of Commerce both congratulated Biden and urged the importance of working together on pandemic relief.

  • Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins, in congratulating Biden, said the company looks forward to focusing on the digital divide and how tech can help fight the coronavirus pandemic alongside the new administration.
  • Microsoft, along with tech trade groups the Information Technology and Industry Council, TechNet, the Business Software Alliance and others congratulated Biden and outlined policy priorities for their administration, including delivering federal legislation to create uniform data privacy policies for the whole country, rather than a series of state laws.

What's next: "There's no doubt that we're going to face a very, very difficult few months ahead here with the coronavirus. So the sooner the better in terms of getting the transition going and getting plans made for what comes next. I think that would probably be a very widely held view in the business community," Padilla said.

Go deeper

Legacy civil rights groups: Biden's transition needs to include us

President-elect Joe Biden at the NAACP 110th National Convention last year. Photo: Bill Pugliano via Getty

Prominent civil rights leaders are concerned that President-elect Joe Biden is deciding his administration without their input, NBC News reported Tuesday.

Why it matters: As Biden looks to deliver his promise of forming a diverse administration, he will have to contend with different factions of the liberal movement that might pull him in different directions.

18 hours ago - World

Biden says he won't immediately remove U.S. tariffs on China

President-elect Joe Biden during an event in Wilmington, Delaware, on Tuesday. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump's 25% tariffs imposed on China under the phase one trade deal will remain in place at the start of the new administration, President-elect Biden said in an interview with the New York Times published early Wednesday.

Details: "I'm not going to make any immediate moves, and the same applies to the tariffs," Biden said. He plans to conduct a full review of the current U.S. policy on China and speak with key allies in Asia and Europe to "develop a coherent strategy," he said.

Biden's economic team will write a new crisis playbook

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Joe Biden's economic team faces a daunting task helping the millions of Americans who have lost their jobs or otherwise been financially ravaged by the coronavirus. But most of them have first-hand crisis experience, dating back to when Barack Obama inherited a crumbling economy when he took office in 2009.

Why it matters: Most of President-elect Biden's economic nominees served in the Obama administration, and wish that they could have gone bigger to help America recover from the 2008 financial crisis. But it's not going to be easy for them to push through massive fiscal spending in 2021.