Jan 12, 2019

Bud Light to begin disclosing nutrition facts

Photo: AP

Starting next month, packages of Bud Light will have bigger nutrition labels, showing the beer's calories and ingredients as well as the amount of fat, carbohydrates and protein in a serving, AP's Dee-Ann Durbin reports.

Why it matters: "Bud Light is likely the first of many to make the move. The labels aren't legally required, but major beer makers agreed in 2016 to voluntarily disclose nutrition facts on their products by 2020.

  • "Many brands, including Corona Light, Guinness, Heineken and Coors Light, already have calories and other nutrition information on their bottles or packaging. But it's in small type, or hidden on the bottom of the six-pack, and ingredients aren't listed."

"Bud Light went with a big, black-and-white label, similar to the ones required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on packaged foods. At the top, Bud Light lists its four ingredients: water, barley, rice and hops."

  • "Below that, it shows the calories in a 12-ounce bottle or can (110) ... Bud Light contains 2% of the recommended daily amount of carbohydrates."
  • Andy Goeler, vice president of marketing for Bud Light, said the brand's research shows younger drinkers want to know what's in their beer.

Fun fact: "Researchers at Cornell University and Louisiana State University tracked what happened when diners were given menus with calorie counts. ... [D]iners who knew the calorie counts ordered lower-calorie appetizers and entrees, but the calorie counts had little impact on orders for drinks and desserts."

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