Aug 6, 2019

House Judiciary requests Kavanaugh records withheld during confirmation

Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) has sent a letter to the National Archives and Records Administration requesting that it turn over documents stemming from its review of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's time in the Bush White House from 2001 to 2006.

The big picture: Prior to voting on his nomination, former Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) requested documents from the National Archives related to Kavanaugh's time in the White House Counsel's Office. Grassley later withdrew his request after receiving some of the records from a private attorney, though tens of thousands of documents were withheld.

Nadler writes that the records are relevant to the committee's review of legislation to create a Supreme Court code of ethics.

“In the coming year, the Supreme Court will again address important matters regarding civil rights, criminal justice, and immigration. The Court may also review certain high-profile cases related to reproductive rights, the separation of powers, and the limits of executive authority — all topics within the jurisdiction of the House Judiciary Committee."

Read the letter:

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House Democrats formally file lawsuit to force Don McGahn to testify

Photo: Xinhua/Ting Shen via Getty Images

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) filed a lawsuit Wednesday to enforce a subpoena compelling former White House counsel Don McGahn to testify in the committee's investigation of President Trump's potential obstruction of justice.

Why it matters: McGahn, a key witness in former special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation who sat for more than 30 hours of interviews, has been blocked by the White House from complying with the subpoena, which was issued in April. In a letter to House Democrats, Speaker Nancy Pelosi stated that the McGahn lawsuit is part of the process of gathering "all the relevant facts" for the House to consider "whether to exercise its full Article I powers, including a constitutional power of the utmost gravity — articles of impeachment."

Go deeperArrowAug 7, 2019

House Judiciary launches bipartisan investigation into Epstein death

Photo: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee on Monday launched a bipartisan investigation into the death of Jeffrey Epstein by apparent suicide in a Manhattan jail.

The big picture: In a letter to the acting director of the Bureau of Prisons, Hugh Hurwitz, House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) and Ranking Member Doug Collins (R-Ga.) demanded answers to 23 questions — most of which concern the conditions of the facility Epstein was kept in and the circumstances of his death. Attorney General Bill Barr, who earlier announced that the FBI and the Justice Department's inspector general will also be investigating Epstein's death, said Monday that he was "appalled" by "serious irregularities" at the facility.

Go deeperArrowAug 12, 2019

House Judiciary subpoenas Corey Lewandowski to testify in obstruction probe

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The House Judiciary Committee subpoenaed former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski and former White House official Rick Dearborn on Thursday to testify Sept. 17 about potential obstruction of justice by President Trump.

The big picture: The testimonies are part of the ongoing investigation by the committee — recently dubbed "formal impeachment proceedings" by House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) — into "obstruction, corruption and abuse of power by Trump and his associates." Unlike the other witnesses in the Mueller investigation who have been subpoenaed by the Judiciary committee, Lewandowski never worked in the Trump White House — a fact that Democrats hope will prevent the president from blocking his testimony.