Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

The populist nationalist — and Trump-boosting — website Breitbart News is slowly populating the White House. It's also adding to its D.C. reporting team.

Editor-in-chief Alexander Marlow tells us they're planning three new hires. They're part of a broader planned expansion of both domestic and global coverage:

  • Sam Chi – Editor. Chi comes from RealClear Politics, where he oversaw the launching of several sites, including World, Science, Religion and History.
  • Kristina Wong – Pentagon & Department of Defense Reporter. Wong previously reported for The Hill, covering the Pentagon and defense affairs on Capitol Hill.
  • Sean Moran - Policy Reporter Sean Moran previously worked as a policy analyst for Americans for Prosperity and the Chamber of Digital Commerce.

These hires follow Breitbart's recruitment last month of John Carney from the Wall Street Journal to run the website's economics vertical.

In addition to the new hires, Breitbart News is reassigning political reporters Michelle Moons and Adelle Nazarian to cover Capitol Hill.

"We have plans to hire about 20 full time editorial personnel this year as of now and have made at least five such hires thus far," says Marlow.

Marlow tells us that Breitbart is also planning to open bureaus in Paris, Berlin, and possibly Brussels. Germany's the big one. Expect the outlet to campaign aggressively against German leader Angela Merkel. Marlow and co. (and that co. includes Trump) view her as a "globalist" who destroyed her own country by opening the borders to a flood of refugees.

Says Marlow:

"We have about a 100 total people working on editorial, move than 10 in UK, about 5 Jerusalem. I can't put an exact number on Germany/France/Belgium expectations but we'll plan on having reporters stationed there shortly."

Why this matters: Trump's chief strategist is Steve Bannon, the former chairman of Breitbart. At the same time he's guiding big picture strategy in the White House, his old news organization is ascending in D.C and trying to stoke populist nationalist movements abroad. They'll have real access in the White House for the first time, and the new Press Secretary Sean Spicer will treat them as a mainstream outlet. (That would've been unimaginable a few months ago. Hillary Clinton dedicated a speech to the 'alt-right' in which she described Breitbart as a race-baiting malevolent force.)

Go deeper

OIG: HHS misused millions of dollars intended for public health threats

Vaccine vials. Photo: Punit Paranjpe/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Office of Special Counsel alerted the White House and Congress on Wednesday of an investigation that found the Department of Health and Human Services misused millions of dollars that were budgeted for vaccine research and public health emergencies for Ebola, Zika and now the COVID-19 pandemic.

Why it matters: The more than 200-page investigation corroborated claims from a whistleblower, showing the agency's violation of the Purpose Statute spanned both the Obama and Trump administrations and paid for unrelated projects like salaries, news subscriptions and the removal of office furniture.

John Kerry: U.S.-China climate cooperation is a "critical standalone issue"

President Biden's special climate envoy John Kerry said Wednesday that the U.S. must deal with China on climate change as a "critical standalone issue," but stressed that confronting Beijing's human rights and trade abuses "will never be traded" for climate cooperation.

Why it matters: The last few years have brought about a bipartisan consensus on the threat posed by China. But as the world's largest greenhouse gas emitter, China will be a vital player if the world is going to come close to reining in emissions on the scale needed to meet the Paris Agreement goals of limiting warming to 2°C above pre-industrial levels.

In cyber espionage, U.S. is both hunted and hunter

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

American outrage over foreign cyber espionage, like Russia's SolarWinds hack, obscures the uncomfortable reality that the U.S. secretly does just the same thing to other countries.

Why it matters: Secrecy is often necessary in cyber spying to protect sources and methods, preserve strategic edges that may stem from purloined information, and prevent diplomatic incidents.