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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Products from major American companies including Apple, GM, Coca-Cola and even Facebook may soon become unavailable, as the fallout from the COVID-19 outbreak backs up and shuts down global supply chains.

Why it matters: Consumers should brace themselves for products to go missing in the coming weeks and months — and it may not be the ones they expect.

For example: Facebook is already short on Oculus VR headsets, and Apple has reportedly told support staff that replacement iPhones for some devices will be in short supply for two to four weeks, our colleague Ina Fried notes.

  • Coca-Cola warned in late February that products in artificial sweeteners used in Diet Coke have been delayed.

Other day-to-day essentials could be in short supply, too.

Procter & Gamble, which makes everything from toilet paper to laundry detergent, has more than 300 suppliers in China that provide 9,000 different materials for its products.

  • “Each of these suppliers faces their own challenges in resuming operations," Jon Moeller, P&G’s CFO. told analysts last month. "The challenges change with the hour."

Go deeper: The coronavirus hasn't upended the pharmaceutical supply yet, but the federal government is acutely aware that dozens of prescription drugs are at risk of shortage.

  • The FDA is working with 180 drug companies and 63 medical device manufacturers to evaluate whether their products and components are at risk.
  • However, it has suspended most inspections of foreign manufacturing sites through April.

The big picture: The supply shortage will likely expand significantly, experts say.

  • "As East Asia starts to recover, the focus turns to Europe and then to North America," Joe Brusuelas, chief economist at tax and consulting firm RSM, tells Axios.
  • He expects a cascade of shocks to continue, "with the worst impact for businesses to come in April and May."

Chinese supply chains may be lumbering back, but there will likely be rolling auto parts shortages in other regions of the world, mirroring the spread of the virus, throughout 2020, Andrew Chien, a partner at consulting firm Oliver Wyman, tells Axios.

  • The next risk will likely come from Korea, where most of the world’s memory chips are made. Carmakers have a few weeks’ buffer of supply, but Chien expects to see shortages within a month.
  • Other potential shortages could include components imported from Italy: Brembo brakes, Pirelli tires, and FiatChrysler engines and transmissions.

By the numbers: A survey released Wednesday by data provider ISM shows the virus outbreak has caused supply chain disruptions for nearly three-quarters of U.S. companies, and many are already pricing in revenue losses this year as a result.

What's next: Companies in multiple industries tell Axios that the situation remains fluid, with teams of people monitoring supply chain issues around the clock.

  • Shipping and delivery could become a new operational chokepoint, especially if more regions end up in lockdown like Italy.

Go deeper

House passes sweeping election and anti-corruption bill

Photo: Win McNamee via Getty Images

The House voted 220-210Wednesday to pass Democrats' expansive election and anti-corruption bill.

Why it matters: Expanding voting access has been a top priority for Democrats for years, but the House passage of the For the People Act (H.R. 1) comes as states across the country consider legislation to rollback voting access in the aftermath of former President Trump's loss.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

House passes George Floyd Justice in Policing Act

Photo: Stephen Maturen via Getty Images

The House voted 220 to 212 on Wednesday evening to pass a policing bill named for George Floyd, the Black man whose death in Minneapolis last year led to nationwide protests against police brutality and racial injustice.

Why it matters: The legislation overhauls qualified immunity for police officers, bans chokeholds at the federal level, prohibits no-knock warrants in federal drug cases and outlaws racial profiling.

6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Senate Republicans plan to exact pain before COVID relief vote

Sen. Ron Johnson. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Republicans are demanding a full, 600-page bill reading — and painful, multi-hour "vote-a-rama" — as Democrats forge ahead with their plan to pass President Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package.

Why it matters: The procedural war is aimed at forcing Democrats to defend several parts the GOP considers unnecessary and partisan. While the process won't substantially impact the final version of the mammoth bill, it'll provide plenty of ammunition for future campaign messaging.