Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

BP CEO Bob Dudley at the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills in April. Photo: Michael Kovac/Getty Images

BP chief executive Bob Dudley has indicated that his company is likely to stay in industry trade groups despite differences in positions on climate policy.

What they’re saying: "BP believes that you can influence trade associations and other groups by being a part of them rather than outside of them," Dudley told Axios on the sidelines of a climate-change event in New York this week.

Driving the news: BP is conducting a review of its membership in trade groups and will report back to shareholders in 2020, BP Chairman Helge Lund said earlier this year. Dudley didn't comment on the ongoing review, but his remarks hint that the oil giant isn't likely to part company with the K Street establishment despite differences.

Where it stands: Facing public, investor and legal pressure, oil companies are increasingly backing action on the issue of climate change while still remaining members of trade associations whose positions don’t align with that shift.

  • Royal Dutch Shell, another major oil and gas producer based in Europe, left earlier this year the American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers, which represents oil and gas refining interests, due to differences over climate policy.
  • ExxonMobil is opting to stay in groups like AFPM to try to influence them on climate change, an official said this summer.
  • Virtually all oil companies have opted to stay in the American Petroleum Institute, the broadest oil trade group that also sets standards across the sector in addition to its lobbying activities.

One level deeper: Dudley, like the Exxon, said trade groups provide more than one purpose, so it’s beneficial to stay involved despite differences. "I respect Shell’s position," Dudley said about that company’s moves. "I think collaboration inside organizations is a better track. It doesn’t always work. We’ve left associations in the past."

  • A high-profile example is when BP left the conservative American Legislative Exchange Council in 2015. That group has lost several corporate members in recent years due to its position doubting established climate-change science.

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
1 hour ago - Podcasts

Net neutrality on the line under Biden

Federal net neutrality rules are back on the table in the Biden administration, after being nixed by Trump, but now might be complicated by the debate over social media companies' behavior.

Axios Re:Cap digs into why net neutrality matters and what comes next with Nilay Patel, editor-in-chief of The Verge and host of the Decoder podcast.

House grants waiver for retired Gen. Lloyd Austin to lead Pentagon

Defense Secretary nominee Lloyd Austin Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The House voted 326-78 on Thursday to grant retired Gen. Lloyd Austin a waiver to lead the Pentagon, clearing the way for the Senate to confirm President Biden's nominee for defense secretary as early as this week.

Why it matters: Austin's nomination received pushback from some lawmakers, including Democrats, who cited a law that requires officers be out of the military for at least seven years before taking the job — a statute intended to reinforce the tradition of civilian control of the Pentagon.

Amanda Gorman steals the show on Inauguration Day

Data: NewsWhip; Chart: Axios Visuals

Poet Amanda Gorman by far generated the most average interactions on social media on Inauguration Day, according to exclusive data from NewsWhip.

You’ve caught up. Now what?

Sign up for Mike Allen’s daily Axios AM and PM newsletters to get smarter, faster on the news that matters.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!