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Photos: Ethan Miller, Mike Coppola/Getty Images

The U.S. Secret Service announced Wednesday that it has intercepted two explosive devices sent to the home of Hillary and Bill Clinton and the office of Barack Obama.

The big picture: The revelation comes two days after a similar explosive device was found in the mailbox of liberal philanthropist George Soros. CNN's New York headquarters and the Florida office of former DNC chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz were also evacuated Wednesday after receiving suspicious packages. The Secret Service has not revealed whether the incidents are related or whether they came from the same source.

Statement from USSS:

"The U.S. Secret Service has intercepted two suspicious packages addressed to Secret Service protectees.
Late on October 23, 2018, the Secret Service recovered a single package addressed to Former First Lady Hillary Clinton in Westchester County, New York. Early this morning, October 24, 2018, a second package addressed to Former President Barack Obama was intercepted by Secret Service personnel in Washington, DC.
The packages were immediately identified during routine mail screening procedures as potential explosive devices and were appropriately handled as such. The protectees did not receive the packages nor were they at risk of receiving them.
The Secret Service has initiated a full scope criminal investigation that will leverage all available federal, state, and local resources to determine the source of the packages and identify those responsible."

Statement from White House

“We condemn the attempted violent attacks recently made against President Obama, President Clinton, Secretary Clinton, and other public figures. These terrorizing acts are despicable, and anyone responsible will be held accountable to the fullest extent of the law. The United States Secret Service and other law enforcement agencies are investigating and will take all appropriate actions to protect anyone threatened by these cowards.”

Correction: A previous version of this article stated that a bomb was sent to the home of Barack and Michelle Obama. It has been updated to reflect that the bomb was sent to Barack Obama's office in Washington, D.C., not his home.

Go deeper

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The college sports landscape could change more in the next six months than it has in the last 50 years, as the NCAA grapples with new competition, new laws and new rules.

How it works... 1. Startup leagues: Investors are flocking to new leagues that aim to compete with the NCAA, evidence of just how much opposition there is to the amateurism model — and how much belief there is in new ones.

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Why it matters: Malaria kills over 400,000 people a year, more than half of them children under the age of 5. Deaths have fallen in half over the past 20 years thanks to investment in prevention and drugs, but a truly effective malaria vaccine would represent one of the greatest victories in the history of public health.

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2 hours ago - Economy & Business

87% of Americans are worried about inflation

Expand chart
Data: CivicScience; Chart: Will Chase/Axios

Americans are growing more concerned about rising costs and are consistently boosting their inflation expectations, new data show.

Driving the news: A new survey from CivicScience shows 87% of those surveyed in a representative sample of U.S. adults say they are at least "somewhat concerned" about the increasing cost of household expenses (all numbers are rounded to the nearest percentage point).

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