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A group of attendees play a game of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons at Comic-Con International. Photo: Daniel Knighton / FilmMagic

"Board game nights are having a moment," Marie Elizabeth Oliver writes in the WashPost.

Our thought bubble: As the friend who alerted us to this trend put it: "It's counterintuitive, but it makes sense." We think we all want to be on our screens. But with the world going so fast on social media, board games give us a chance to break away from the stress, relax and be real again.

  • Kyle Engen, founder of the Interactive Museum of Gaming and Puzzlery: "By our calculations, we are in the golden age of board games."
  • "There’s plenty of speculation about what’s driving the boom — video games, the Internet, millennials preferring to socialize at home, hygge-style — but Barry 'BJ' Rozas, a lawyer from Louisiana who moonlights as a board game reviewer, says it really comes down to one thing: 'Today’s games are better.'"
  • Matthew Hudak, toys and games analyst with Euromonitor International, cites a recent market report that sales of games and puzzles grew by 15% in 2016.
  • Hudak: “It’s something that has been bubbling up for years now, but 2016 was the most influential year for board games ... There were more than 5,000 board games introduced into the U.S. market last year.”

Go deeper

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat.
  2. World: Greece tightens coronavirus restrictions as Europe cases spike.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: Fully at-home rapid COVID test to move forward.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."

Trump's legacy is shaped by his narrow interests

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

President Trump's policy legacy is as much defined by what he's ignored as by what he's involved himself in.

The big picture: Over the past four years, Trump has interested himself in only a slim slice of the government he leads. Outside of trade, immigration, a personal war against the "Deep State" and the hot foreign policy issue of the moment, Trump has left many of his Cabinet secretaries to work without interruption, let alone direction.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
5 hours ago - Technology

AI and automation are creating a hybrid workforce

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

AI and automation are receiving a boost during the coronavirus pandemic that in the short term is creating a new hybrid workforce rather than destroying jobs outright.

The big picture: While the forces of automation and AI will eliminate some jobs and create some new ones, the vast majority will remain but be dramatically changed. The challenge for employers will be ensuring workforces are ready for the effects of technology.