A Blue Apron box. Photo: Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Meal prep company Blue Apron noted a profit in its first quarter earnings report yesterday, but it wasn't enough for investors who sold the stock after the report.

The big picture: It looks to be too little, too late, the Wall Street Journal's Elizabeth Winkler reports, "As the company has struggled, many employees — including all three of its founders — have left. The company’s market value of around $220 million is just one-tenth of what it was worth when it went public in June 2017."

Details: Blue Apron reported a profit and has made progress cutting costs, but it also has reduced its customer base.

  • In the first quarter, customer count fell to 550,000 from a peak of more than 1 million in March 2017. Total sales also are moving in the wrong direction: $141.9 million for the quarter, down from $196.7 million in the same period last year.

The verdict: "Perhaps Blue Apron can eke out a few more dollars per customer, but the market for this product has proved to be a niche one."

Go deeper: The rise and fall of Stitch Fix

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Post-debate poll finds Biden strong on every major issue

Joe Biden speaks Friday about "The Biden Plan to Beat COVID-19," at The Queen theater in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

This is one of the bigger signs of trouble for President Trump that we've seen in a poll: Of the final debate's seven topics, Joe Biden won or tied on all seven when viewers in a massive Axios-SurveyMonkey sample were asked who they trusted more to handle the issue.

Why it matters: In a time of unprecedented colliding crises for the nation, the polling considered Biden to be vastly more competent.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
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The murder hornets are here

A braver man than me holds a speciment of the Asian giant hornet. Photo: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Entomologists in Washington state on Thursday discovered the first Asian giant hornet nest in the U.S.

Why it matters: You may know this insect species by its nom de guerre: "the murder hornet." While the threat they pose to humans has been overstated, the invading hornets could decimate local honeybee populations if they establish themselves.