Mike Bloomberg campaigns in Orlando, Florida, on Super Tuesday. Photo: Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

After Mike Bloomberg dropped his self-funded presidential run on Wednesday, Bloomberg News editor-in-chief John Micklethwait announced that the organization would return to its "normal coverage of the election," reports CNN's Brian Stelter.

Flashback: In November, the outlet said it would "extend its policy of not investigating" Bloomberg, its owner, "to all Democrats running for president in 2020."

  • That decision led President Trump's campaign to blacklist Bloomberg News from its events in December. It's not yet clear if the Trump campaign will walk back that policy now that Bloomberg is out of the race.

What he's saying:

"Now that Mike has said he is leaving the race for President, we will return to our normal coverage of the election; we will follow exactly the same coverage rules for the Democratic presidential candidates and President Donald Trump. We will disclose Mike's financial support for other Democrats — just as we have always done where his financial support for political causes is relevant to our reporting.
I would like to pay tribute to everybody who has covered the campaigns — and the independent way that we have reported the race. As I pointed out back on November 24th, we found ourselves in an unprecedented situation: no other newsroom of our size has had to deal with anything similar. "
— John Micklethwait's statement on Wednesday, via Stelter

Go deeper: Bloomberg suspends presidential campaign, endorses Biden

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