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The Blackstone Group has completed its $400 million preferred stock investment in cybersecurity firm FireEye (Nasdaq: FEYE), with ClearSky also participating. The deal was announced in late November.

The big picture: FireEye stunned the cybersecurity world last week by admitting its systems were breached by what it called "a nation with top-tier offensive capabilities." The disclosure now appears to have been the bleeding edge of a much larger hack that was allegedly conducted by Russia's foreign intelligence service, with victims including the U.S. Treasury and Commerce Departments.

Details: The preferred shares convert into common at $17.25 per share. FireEye stock closed trading Friday at $13.83, having fallen more than 10% last week due to the intrusion.

The bottom line: "The hacking operation exposed as many as hundreds of thousands of government and corporate networks to potential risk and alarmed national-security officials in the Trump administration as well as executives at FireEye, some of whom view it as far more significant than a routine case of foreign cyber espionage." — Dustin Volz, WSJ

Go deeper

National Security Council names Russia as "likely" origin of U.S. agency breach

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A U.S. task force responsible for investigating the massive cyberattack that breached the departments of Defense, State and Homeland Security — among others — identified the hack as "likely Russian in origin," per a joint statement on Tuesday.

Why it matters: This is the first time the federal government has formally named Russia as the likely origin of the attack.

Kaine, Collins' censure resolution seeks to bar Trump from holding office again

Sen. Tim Kaine (center) and Sen. Susan Collins (right). Photo: Andrew Harnik/Pool via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) are forging ahead with a draft proposal to censure former President Trump, and are considering introducing the resolution on the Senate floor next week.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction, Axios Alayna Treene writes. "I think it’s important for the Senate's leadership to understand that there are alternatives," Kaine told CNN on Wednesday.

Stark reminder for America's corporate leaders

Rosalind "Roz" Brewer is about to become only the second Black woman to permanently lead a Fortune 500 company. She starts as Walgreens CEO on March 15.

Why it matters: It's a stark reminder of how far corporate America's top decision-makers have to go during an unprecedented push by politicians, employees and even a stock exchange to diversify their top ranks.