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Reproduced from Morning Consult; Note: ±2% margin of error; Chart: Axios Visuals

Black and Hispanic communities are less likely than white communities to trust the safety of their tap water, according to Morning Consult survey data out this week.

Why it matters: There's now a greater understanding of the links between the environment and health — and the role systemic racism has played in the distribution of pollution across communities of color.

  • "These environmental inequalities aren't the result of any one action, but rather the layering of local, state and federal policies that segregated communities and incentivized white people to leave urban centers," writes Morning Consult reporter Lisa Martine Jenkins.

By the numbers: Among all adults, 42% reported high levels of concern about local pollution's impact on their health.

  • That number jumps to 61% among Hispanic respondents.
  • 56% of Black adults are extremely or very concerned.

When it comes to tap water, the disparity is even more striking. A poll found a 22-point gap between white and Black respondents on trusting the quality of their tap water.

  • Just 53% of Hispanic respondents said they trust their tap water.
  • Black respondents were twice as likely as white ones to say they don't trust their water but drink it anyway.
  • Meanwhile, 38% of Black adults and 33% of Hispanics purchase water separately, compared to 27% of white people.

The big picture: The water-quality controversies in cities like Flint and Newark have led to a larger distrust of the government's handling of local environmental issues plus a deep skepticism of a community's infrastructure.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Miriam Kramer, author of Space
Oct 8, 2020 - Science

Piecing together an asteroid's history

A global map of Bennu. Photo: Simon et al., Science (2020)

The space rock that eventually gave rise to the asteroid Bennu — currently being studied from close range by NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft — may have had flowing water, according to a new study in the journal Science.

Why it matters: Asteroids are thought to be building blocks leftover from the early days of the solar system, and understanding their nature could provide insights into its evolution.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
Updated 8 mins ago - Economy & Business

How central banks can save the world

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The trillion-dollar gap between actual GDP and potential GDP is a gap made up of misery, unemployment, and unfulfilled promise. It's also a gap that can be eradicated — if central banks embrace unconventional monetary policy.

  • That's the message from Eric Lonergan and Megan Greene, two economists who reject the idea that central banks have hit a "lower bound" on interest rates. In fact, they reject the idea that "interest rates" are a singular thing at all, and they fullthroatedly reject the idea — most recently put forward by New York Fed president Bill Dudley — that the Fed is "out of firepower."

Why it matters: If Lonergan and Greene are right, then central banks have effectively unlimited ammunition in their fight to increase inflation and employment. They are limited only by political will.

Updated 27 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Large coronavirus outbreaks leading to high death rates — Coronavirus cases are at an all-time high ahead of Election Day — Fauci says U.S. may not return to normal until 2022
  2. Politics: Top HHS spokesperson pitched coronavirus ad campaign as "helping the president" — Space Force's No. 2 general tests positive for coronavirus
  3. World: Taiwan reaches a record 200 days with no local coronavirus cases — Europe faces "stronger and deadlier" wave France imposes lockdown Germany to close bars and restaurants for a month.
  4. Sports: Boston Marathon delayed MLB to investigate Dodgers player who joined celebration after positive COVID test.