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Data: KFF; Chart: Axios Visuals

Strikingly large shares of Black Americans say they would be reluctant to get a coronavirus vaccine — even if it was free and had been deemed safe by scientists, according to a new nationwide survey from KFF and The Undefeated.

Why it matters: The findings reflect well-founded distrust of government and health care institutions, and they underscore the need for credible outreach efforts when a vaccine is distributed. Otherwise, distribution could fail to effectively reach the Black community, which has been disproportionately affected by coronavirus.

By the numbers: Just 17% of Black American adults say they definitely will get a Covid-19 vaccine if it were determined to be safe by scientists and it was free; 49% said they would not get it.

  • Large shares are skeptical even among people at the highest risk. Just 20% of Black people with a serious health condition say they definitely would get a safe, free vaccine, as did 24% of those who have a health care worker in the home and 25% of Black seniors.
  • Just 9% of Black adults feel very confident that a vaccine will have been properly tested or will be distributed fairly.

Between the lines: Vaccine hesitancy in the Black community is rooted in experiences with discrimination and systemic racism.

  • The share of Black people who say racial discrimination in health care is commonplace has increased from 56% in 1999 to 70% now.

What’s next: Vaccine distribution will likely begin with health care workers, providing real-world evidence of safety.

  • Political leaders and public health officials who have credibility in communities of color could also help reduce vaccine hesitancy.

The bottom line: A vaccine distribution effort that is not coupled with a credible outreach effort in communities of color is likely to fall far short of reaching many of the people who are most at risk.

Go deeper: Axios-Ipsos poll: The racial gap on coronavirus vaccine

Go deeper

Updated 9 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — Fauci: Hotspots have materialized across "the entire country."
  2. World: Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of cases.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
  7. Sports: High school football's pandemic struggles.
  8. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.
16 hours ago - Health

CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order"

The Pacific Princess cruise ship is shown docked at the Port of Los Angeles. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Friday it's replacing its "no-sail" order on U.S. cruises with a less restrictive "Conditional Sailing Order," setting the stage for the phased resumption of passenger cruise line travel.

Why it matters: Cruise ships were the sites of some of the most severe coronavirus outbreaks early in the pandemic, before the industry shut down in March.

11 hours ago - Health

Fauci: COVID-19 hotspots have materialized across "the entire country"

Anthony Fauci. Photo: Graeme Jennings/AFP via Getty Images

The United States is "seeing hotspots literally throughout the entire country," with a countrywide average of 70,000 COVID-19 cases per day, NIAID director Anthony Fauci told the Silicon Valley Leadership Group's annual forum Friday.

Driving the news: The U.S. hit another grim milestone on Friday, with the total number of confirmed coronavirus cases surpassing 9 million as new infections surge across the country, per data from Johns Hopkins University.